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Results for search "Safety &, Public Health: Misc.".

07 Jun

How Many Microplastic Particles Do We Really Consume?

Men, women and children may be consuming tens of thousands of microplastic particles each year.

29 Mar

States That Ban Texting While Driving Safer?

States with primary texting bans see fewer crash victims in the hospital.

Health News Results - 382

Don't Let Kids Wander Alone in Parking Lots

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many children walk through parking lots without adult supervision, putting them in great danger, a new study warns.

Researchers watched 124 kids, ages 2 to 10, and their adult companions as they crossed a parking lot at a community recreation center.

The team found that 67% of the children lacked adult supervision at some point ...

Most U.S. Parents Say Vaccination Should Be Requirement for School: Poll

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More than 8 in 10 U.S. adults say kids should be required to get vaccinated in order to attend school, but far fewer trust the safety of vaccines, a new poll finds.

The nationwide poll from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health sampled 1,550 adults (704 parents and 846 others) and found 84% support rules requiring schoolkids to be...

Most Cyclists Suffering Head Injuries Not Wearing Helmets: Study

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Only about one in five U.S. adults and one in 10 children and teens who suffered head and neck injuries in cycling crashes said they wore a helmet, a new study finds.

An analysis of data from more than 76,000 cyclists nationwide who experienced such injuries between 2002 and 2012 found that only 21% of men, 28% of women and 12% of...

CDC Revises Number of Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses to 380 in 36 States

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials have revised downward the number of cases of a severe lung injury linked to vaping, from more than 450 cases cited last week to the total of 380 cases announced late Thursday.

The decrease is due to the exclusion of "possible" cases, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention explained. The new case total -- whi...

Stricter Arsenic Standard Made Public Drinking Water Safer: Study

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Stricter U.S. government standards for drinking water have reduced arsenic violations by public water systems, proving such safety regulations work, researchers say.

Public water systems provide more than 80% of the nation's drinking water.

The new standard was introduced in 2001. Since then, the percentage of public water syste...

10 Quick Tips for a Healthier, Safer Life

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Some things that you can do to protect your health take just minutes, so no more excuses! Here are 10 suggestions from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Test your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors every month. Yes, this is an addition to changing the batteries once a year.

Wash your child's toys just as you do y...

Trump Pushing for Nationwide Ban on Flavored E-Cigarettes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As concern grows over hundreds of lung illnesses tied to vaping, the Trump administration on Wednesday said it would move to ban flavored versions of e-cigarettes.

Vaping is harming young people and "we're going to have to do something about it," President Donald Trump said at the Oval Office, The New York Times reported. He was fla...

Booze Taxes Don't Make Up for Societal Costs of Excess Drinking: Study

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol taxes do little to reduce the burden on American taxpayers for the harmful impacts of heavy drinking, a new study finds.

The cost of harm caused by excessive drinking in the United States is just over $2 per drink, with about 80 cents of that shouldered by government. But state and federal alcohol taxes bring in an average of about...

Would a Health Warning on Every Cigarette Help Smokers Quit?

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Health warnings on individual cigarettes could be a more powerful way to coax smokers to quit than warnings on packages, British researchers say.

They assessed the reactions of 120 smokers, 16 and older, to the warning "Smoking kills" printed on individual cigarettes.

Smokers said the warnings could potentially work.

They...

Study Points to Herd Immunity Against HPV in Unvaccinated U.S. Adults

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The United States could be approaching a state of herd immunity against human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus linked to several cancers.

Oral HPV infections declined by 37% among unvaccinated 18- to 59-year-old men between 2009 and 2016, according to a Sept. 10 report in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

That in...

Docs Prescribe More Opioids at Certain Time of Day

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As the day wears on and doctors are rushed and tired, they are more likely to prescribe opioid painkillers, a new study finds.

Interestingly, they weren't more likely to prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin, or physical therapy, the researchers said.

"These findings support the widespread perception among provi...

Some People Vaccinated Against Mumps May Not Be Protected: Study

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There are gaps in immunity against mumps among college-aged Americans who were vaccinated in childhood, researchers say.

New findings show the need to learn more about the immune system response to mumps and mumps vaccination.

Mumps is a highly contagious viral disease that can spread rapidly among people in close living quarters, su...

Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Double, Vitamin E Acetate Leading Suspect

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of cases of severe lung disease linked to vaping has now doubled, with more than 450 people in 33 states struck by the illness, U.S. health officials reported Friday. At least three of those patients have died.

The leading culprit at this point is an oily chemical called vitamin E acetate, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease C...

Health Officials Close in on Culprit in Vaping Lung Injury Cases

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Lab tests have found a chemical derived from vitamin E in samples of vaping products that have sickened people in 25 states.

Investigators at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration discovered the chemical in samples of nearly all the marijuana products used by patients who developed a mysterious lung illness linked to vaping, the Washingto...

Coming Soon: A 'Pot Breathalyzer'?

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Driving while high on marijuana can be as dangerous and illegal as driving drunk, but unlike alcohol, there's no way to detect pot on your breath.

That could change, however, as University of Pittsburgh scientists are working hard to develop a breathalyzer that can measure the psychoactive ingredient in pot. Although the technology may work, ...

As Hurricane Dorian Nears Florida, Experts Urge Safety

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- With category 3 Hurricane Dorian ravaging the Bahamas as it lumbers toward the east coast of Florida,the National Safety Council offered anyone in its path steps to stay safe.

First, the council urges residents to monitor Dorian's progress and heed government warnings.

It's vital to take a look at safety procedures you'll need duri...

Kids in Hot Cars: How to Prevent Heatstroke Deaths

THURSDAY, Aug. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hot car deaths set a U.S. record last year, with 53 children dead because they were left behind or got trapped inside an overheated vehicle, according to the National Safety Council.

So far this year the tally is 35.

Children are especially at risk because their body temperature can rise three to five times faster than that of an ...

Regular Vaccines Advised With Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you have multiple sclerosis (MS), you can and should receive recommended vaccinations -- including annual flu shots, a new American Academy of Neurology guideline says.

"We reviewed all of the available evidence, and for people with MS, preventing infections through vaccine use is a key part of medical care," said guideline lead author D...

Your Chocolate Pot 'Edible' Could Hold a Hidden Danger

SUNDAY, Aug. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A quirk in quality testing could mean that pot-laced chocolates are more potent than their label indicates, researchers report.

Many states that allow the sale of marijuana-infused edibles -- gummy bears, cookies and chocolates -- require package labeling that shows the products' level of THC, the compound that gets...

Dirty Air Is Deadly, Global Study Confirms

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution -- especially the fine particles that you breathe into your lungs -- can shorten your life, a global study reports.

The new research found that short-term exposure to air pollution upped the daily risk of death from all causes. The risk of dying from heart disease, stroke and lung disease also rose with exposure to fine parti...

Texas Cities Are Ripe for Measles Outbreaks, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Texas cities are in danger of major measles outbreaks because an alarming number of school kids are unvaccinated, researchers warn.

Vaccination rates in the state have declined since 2003 and a computer simulation by University of Pittsburgh researchers found that an additional 5% decrease could increase the size of a measles outbreak b...

When Is It Time for Seniors to Hand Over the Car Keys?

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Driving is a source of independence for many seniors, so determining when they should hang up the keys requires careful consideration, an expert says.

"Driving retirement is a normal part of aging, and should be carefully considered and discussed openly," said Dr. Ericka Tung, an internist and geriatrician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Min...

Supplement Pills Can Pose Choking Risk for Seniors, Study Finds

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Large pills and dietary supplements can be tough for anyone to swallow, but new research finds they may pose a potentially dire risk to seniors.

A study from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration found that between 2006 and 2015, almost 4,000 people had trouble swallowing dietary supplements that was serious enough to report. Three people died ...

Climate Change Could Raise Mercury Levels in Some Fish

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study adds to the list of potential health threats from global warming: Higher mercury levels in certain fish.

While eating fish is considered part of a healthy diet, it's also a source of mercury -- which, in high enough amounts, is toxic to the nervous system and kidneys.

Small fish generally have only small amounts of merc...

In Heat Waves, Fans May Do More Harm Than Good

TUESDAY, Aug. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thinking of picking up an electric fan to help keep you cool and protect your health during the next heat wave?

You might want to think again.

Electric fans might make you feel cooler, but they can actually increase your risk of becoming heat sick and even dying from a heat stroke, the evidence shows.

Electric fans could co...

Trouble Driving At Night? Yellow Lenses Won't Help

FRIDAY, Aug. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Night-driving" glasses that promise to dim the glare of headlights may not work as advertised, a new study finds.

The glasses, featuring yellow-tinted lenses, have been marketed for years as a way to ward off blinding headlights and make night driving easier. The problem: There's no scientific evidence they work.

Now a new study, pub...

CDC Renews Pledge to Fight Ebola Outbreak in Africa

THURSDAY, Aug. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a show of support for international efforts to contain the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), U.S. health officials said Thursday that they remain committed to helping stem the spread of the deadly virus.

The outbreak was declared a year ago in the eastern part of the African nation. However, armed conflict and o...

What Happens When Parents Talk to Kids Frankly About Sex?

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Parents who worry about discussing sex with their kids can relax: New research shows it leads teens to adopt safer practices and doesn't make them more likely to become sexually active.

That's the upshot of an analysis of 31 studies on the effectiveness of parent-based sexual health interventions. The research included nearly 12,500 9- to 18-y...

Where Is Your Risk of Dying Greatest After Surgery?

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have noncardiac surgery are much more likely to die after they leave the hospital than in the operating room, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 40,000 adults, age 45 and older, who were operated on at 28 centers in 14 countries in North and South America, Asia, Europe, Africa and Australia.

Of tho...

Guns in Home, Greater Odds of Family Homicide

MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Family members are at risk of being killed in homes with guns in the United States, a new study suggests.

For each 10% jump in home ownership of guns, the risk of someone in the household being killed rises by 13%. The risk of a nonfamily member getting murdered is increased only 2% with gun ownership, researchers found.

...

As Heat Bakes the Nation, Expert Offers Tips to Stay Safe

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The heat is on.

Across two-thirds of the United States, over 115 million Americans live where some level of heat alert is already in effect, and 290 million will see temperatures soar past 90 degrees at some point in the next week, USA Today reported Wednesday.

As a dome of high pressure settles over much of the eastern and ...

Menstrual Cups Equal Pads, Tampons in Effectiveness, Data Shows

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- They're gaining in popularity among women, and a new study finds menstrual cups to be just as safe and as effective as disposable pads or tampons.

British researchers looked at data on the cost-saving devices, gleaned from 43 studies involving more than 3,300 women and girls worldwide.

Reporting July 17 in The Lancet Public Hea...

Is an Elusive U.S. Total Ban on Asbestos Finally in Sight?

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new U.S. government rule on asbestos is at best a toothless measure against the cancer-causing material, critics charge.

The rule, laid out by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), went into effect in June. The agency says it was designed to strengthen decades-old public health protections.

But two former government off...

Don't Let Fireworks Deafen You

THURSDAY, July 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fireworks are a beautiful sight to behold, but they can damage your hearing if you're not careful.

Protecting your hearing should be one of the safety precautions you take when you and your family are at fireworks displays and other events on the Fourth of July, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) says.

Fireworks...

WIC Changes Improve Moms' and Babies' Health

WEDNESDAY, July 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Major changes to a U.S. federal nutrition program for the poor have made both women and their babies healthier, a new study finds.

Known as WIC, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children has been around since the 1970s. Changes in 2009 added more fruits and vegetables, which helped reduce some birth complicat...

Few U.S. Universities Are Smoke-Free

WEDNESDAY, July 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although many restaurants, offices and even apartment buildings are smoke-free, American universities appear to be an exception.

By 2017, only 1 in 6 had gone completely smoke-free or tobacco-free, a new study reveals.

"Continued success in increasing the adoption of comprehensive smoke-free and tobacco-free protections at institut...

Americans Aware of Antibiotic Resistance, but Don't Always Follow Rx: Poll

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most Americans consider antibiotic resistance a threat to public health, but 45% say they've used antibiotics improperly, a new poll reports.

Of those, 39% did not finish a course of antibiotics and 16% took them without talking first to a health care provider, according to a phone poll of more than 1,200 adults nationwide by th...

Med Students' Smartphones Loaded With Staph, Other Germs

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smartphones have become an essential part of modern medicine, but they might be exposing patients to potentially deadly staph infections, a new study suggests.

Tests of cellphones at a Brazilian medical school revealed that 40% carried Staphylococcus aureus, a common cause of hospital infections.

Worse, 85% of the bact...

Hispanic Teens Losing Sleep Over Trump's Immigration Policies

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic teens are being driven to anxiety and sleeplessness over the Trump Administration's immigration policies, even though they are U.S.-born citizens and face no threat of deportation, a new study shows.

Nearly half of a group of 16-year-old Hispanic children in the Salinas Valley region of California reported that they worry that U.S. im...

'Secret Shopper' Study Shows How Easily Teens Can Buy E-Cigs

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite federal and state age restrictions on the sale of tobacco and vaping products, a new "secret shopper" study found that IDs were checked only about half the time.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires tobacco retailers to check an ID for anyone appearing to be under 27, and California law bars sale of tobacco products, includin...

Global Efforts to Cut Smoking Show Mixed Results

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette use fell in most countries over the past three decades, but increased in some nations, notably China, a new global study says.

Researchers analyzed data from 71 countries that represent 85% of the world's population and account for more than 95% of global cigarette use.

While overall cigarette use declined, there...

Most U.S. Pot Users Think They Can Get Away With Driving High

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most Americans think they won't get caught driving while high on marijuana, a new AAA Foundation survey finds.

Nearly 70% of the nearly 2,600 licensed drivers polled think there's a low chance that a driver using pot will be stopped by police.

"Marijuana can significantly alter reaction times and impair a driver's judgment," s...

Swallowing Toiletries, Makeup Sends Thousands of Kids to ER Each Year

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Take a stroll down the beauty products aisle and you'll see rows of colorful packages, even some with pictures of fruit on them. It's easy to see how about a dozen kids a day end up in the emergency room due to exposure to these enticing chemical concoctions.

Over a 15-year period, nearly 65,000 youngsters under 5 years of age were treated in ...

Drug ODs, Suicides Soaring Among Millennials: Report

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- So-called "deaths of despair" are skyrocketing among millennials, with thousands of 18- to 34-year-olds losing their lives to drugs, alcohol and suicide each year, a new report says.

During the past decade, drug-related deaths among that age group increased by 108%, alcohol-induced deaths by 69%, and suicides by 35%, according to t...

Bats Are Biggest Rabies Danger, CDC Says

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The first thing folks think about with rabies is four-legged critters -- dogs, raccoons, skunks or foxes.

But the most dangerous rabies threat you'll face right now is dangling overhead somewhere, waiting to flutter down and get entwined in your hair.

Bats are responsible for 7 out of 10 rabies deaths in the United States, according t...

Nearly 1 in 4 Home Care Aides Faces Verbal Abuse

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being yelled at or insulted is never easy. But it's a situation faced by about one-quarter of U.S. home health care workers, a new study finds.

Certain environments, such as caring for someone with dementia or working in a very cramped space, were linked to a higher risk of verbal abuse from patients or their kin.

"Our study found...

U.S. Expert Panel Supports HIV-Prevention Pill for People at High Risk

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A daily pill that can block transmission of HIV should be prescribed to people at high risk of infection with the AIDS-causing virus, according to a highly influential panel of experts.

The treatment -- called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) -- has proven highly effective at preventing HIV spread in clinical trials, an evidence review by the...

Blood From Previously Pregnant Women Is Safe for Donation: Study

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Red blood cell donations from women who have been pregnant won't cause fatal reactions in patients who get the blood, a new study finds.

Earlier studies have suggested that women who have been pregnant shouldn't give blood, because antibodies that develop during pregnancy could cause a potentially deadly complication in recipients of their b...

One Simple Food Substitution Might Help Save the Planet

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- One simple change in your diet -- replacing beef with poultry -- could go a long way toward curbing climate change, research shows.

Beef is the largest dietary contributor to greenhouse gases for average people, and replacing it can halve a diner's food-based carbon footprint and improve health, according to findings presented Monday at the Amer...

Guard Your Skin Against the Summer Sun

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Whether you're at the beach, the park or a pool this summer, be sure to protect your skin from the sun's damaging rays.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States, and most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays, according to the American Cancer Society.

"Fortunately, ...

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