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Health News Results - 319

Heart Attack Can Be More Lethal If Symptoms Are More Gradual

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients often take longer to seek help if they have gradual symptoms, which may put them at increased risk of death, researchers say.

Gradual symptoms begin with mild discomfort that slowly worsens, while abrupt symptoms are sudden and severe pain, according to authors of a study published Sept. 12 in the European Journal o...

Occasional Naps Do a Heart Good, Swiss Study Finds

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could grabbing a nap once or twice a week help you live longer?

A new study reports the occasional nap appears to cut in half people's risk of heart attack, strokes and heart disease, compared with folks who never nap.

But more frequent napping provided no benefit, researchers found.

"In fact, we found that frequent nappers...

Even Small Improvements in Cholesterol, Blood Pressure Help Prevent Heart Attack

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Small, lasting changes in cholesterol and blood pressure levels can dramatically reduce the risk of heart disease and strokes over a lifetime, new research suggests.

The large study found that a combination of a drop in LDL cholesterol (the bad type) of 14 mg/dL and a 5 mm Hg drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressur...

Going Vegetarian Good for Your Heart, But May Up Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vegetarianism is all the rage these days, but a new study suggests that slicing meat from your diet might raise your risk of stroke slightly.

While vegetarians had a 22% lower risk for heart disease, they had a 20% higher risk for stroke, British researchers found. Meanwhile, people who ate fish but no other meats (pescatarians) had ...

Poverty Makes Heart Failure Even More Lethal, Study Shows

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new study helps confirm a dismal reality: Poor Americans are more likely to die from heart failure than their richer counterparts.

The likely reasons? According to the researchers, higher obesity rates and associated increases in type 2 diabetes appear to be driving two-thirds of the trend.

"This study underscores the disparitie...

Hurricane Dorian Can Wreak Havoc on Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As Hurricane Dorian rolls up the southeastern coast of the United States, most in its path worry about having enough water, food and batteries to ride the storm out.

But the American Heart Association (AHA) warns that the high stress and trauma of such an event can also trigger heart trouble, especially among heart disease and stroke patie...

Poor Circulation in Legs? Statin Meds Can Keep You Living Longer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Folks with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have a much lower risk of death if they take cholesterol-lowering statins as directed by their doctor, a new study reports.

About 200 million people worldwide suffer from PAD, a condition in which arteries feeding blood to the legs become clogged, researchers explained.

However, patients who ...

Weight-Loss Surgery Drops Heart Disease, Death Risk for Diabetics

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For people who are obese and have type 2 diabetes, weight-loss surgery leads to more than a slimmer figure.

It also reduces the risk of heart complications and premature death by about 40% compared to standard medical care, new research says.

The Cleveland Clinic researchers compared the impact of various types of weight-loss (ba...

Cancer Overtakes Heart Disease as #1 Killer of Middle-Aged in Wealthy Nations

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease still claims the lives of more people globally, but in more affluent nations it has now ceded its place as the leading killer to cancer, a major new report finds.

Around the world, 40% of all deaths are caused by heart disease, making it the number one global killer. That means that of the estimated 55 million people who die...

Could You Be Having a Heart Attack?

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- We tend to think of heart attacks as they're shown in movies, as massive, chest-crushing events, typically affecting older men. But that's not the only case, far from it.

Research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that, even though women get heart attacks less often than men, they have a higher percentag...

After Heart Attack, Stenting More Than the Blocked Artery May Be Best

SUNDAY, Sept. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Opening all of a person's clogged arteries after a heart attack can protect their health better than reopening only the one that caused it, a major international clinical trial has concluded.

Opening all blockages and not just the "culprit" behind the attack reduces a patient's risk of dying or having another heart ...

Long-Term 'Couch Potatoes' May Face Double the Odds for Early Death

SATURDAY, Aug. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Decades spent on couches, chairs and otherwise not exercising could mean much shorter lives, new research shows.

A Norwegian team who tracked health outcomes for more than 23,000 adults over 20 years found that those who were inactive over that time had twice the risk of a premature death, compared to those who we...

Rising Obesity Rates Undermining Strides Made Against Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Aug. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Rising obesity rates, coupled with an associated jump in diabetes and high blood pressure cases, appears to be undoing decades of gains made against heart disease, a new study finds.

After 2010, the rate of deaths from heart disease continued to drop, but more slowly. Deaths from stroke leveled off, and deaths from high blood pressure ("hyper...

Wintertime Smog Tied to Rise in Heart Procedures

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breathing in smoggy air, especially in the colder months, may be especially taxing for the heart, new research out of Europe suggests.

Polish researchers found that high levels of air pollution were tied to spikes in procedures to open blocked heart arteries. This was especially apparent in winter, when pollution levels were highest, a new stu...

Just One Pill for All Your Heart Health Needs? It's On the Way

THURSDAY, Aug. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine a single pill loaded with a battery of heart medications that you take once a day to cut your chances of heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

A new clinical trial has turned that idea into reality.

The "polypill" reduced the risk of life-threatening heart health problems by more than one-third during a five-year period i...

When Does Heart Health Return to Normal After Quitting Smoking?

TUESDAY, Aug. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When you stop smoking, your heart starts to rebound right away, but a full recovery can take as long as 15 years, a new study suggests.

"The benefit of quitting smoking cannot be overstated -- the cardiovascular system begins to recover quickly, with some physiologic changes happening within hours," said lead researcher Meredith Duncan, of th...

'No Quick Fix' for A-Fib, But Cardiologist Says You Can Help Prevent It

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There is no cure for a-fib, but the common heart disorder can be managed, an expert says.

Atrial fibrillation -- which can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications -- affects as many as 6 million people in the United States. It's more common in whites than in blacks and Hispanics, and more common among m...

How Sleep Woes May Strain Your Heart

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you spend a lot of nights watching the clock instead of sleeping, new research suggests you may need to be as concerned about your heart health as you are about lost shut-eye.

People with genetic variants linked to insomnia have an increased risk of heart disease, heart failure and stroke, according to the study....

Heart Experts Support Use of Prescription Fish Oil to Lower Triglyceride Levels

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart experts are advising that prescription-strength fish oil pills might help lower excess levels of blood fats known as triglycerides.

The pills contain heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. When prescribed by a doctor, these meds can lower high triglyceride levels by 20%-30%, according to a new American Heart Association science advis...

For Heart Patients, CPAP Treatment May Ease Depression: Study

FRIDAY, Aug. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of obstructive sleep apnea can ease depression in people with heart disease, according to a groundbreaking new study.

"Patients who have had a stroke or heart attack are prone to suffer from low mood and are two to three times more likely to develop clinical depression, which then further el...

Fast-Food Joints in the Neighborhood? Heart Attack Rates Likely to Go Up

THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you live in a neighborhood where fast-food restaurants abound, you might be more likely to have a heart attack, new research suggests.

It turns out that heart attack rates are higher in neighborhoods with more fast-food joints, the Australian study found.

For every additional fast-food outlet in a neighborhood, there were four a...

More Than Half of Younger Patients Skip or Quit Blood Pressure Meds

THURSDAY, Aug. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure can be a killer. But a new study finds that more than half of younger patients -- those under 65 -- who are prescribed high blood pressure meds either stop taking them within a few months or don't take them as prescribed.

But stopping treatment can prove dangerous, even for the relatively young, the study's lead author w...

Caring Doctors Can Be Life-Changing for Diabetic Patients

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A kind, understanding doctor could spell the difference between life or death for diabetes patients, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that patients had a lower risk of early death if their primary care doctor exhibited empathy.

The study included 628 patients in the U.K. with type 2 diabetes. A year after their diagnos...

AHA News: Daughter Makes Lifesaving Plea to 911: Coach Me Through CPR?

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- In March 2017, Mary Smith took an afternoon off work to visit her daughter and 2-week-old grandson Brody at their Minneapolis suburb home.

Smith brought in groceries for dinner and carried a mobile crib up the stairs from the car. She was in the entryway when she found herself out of breath.

She collapsed, making a...

Plants on Your Plate Will Protect Your Heart

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pile those vegetables and fruits high when you sit down to eat, and your heart will thank you.

A diet rich in plant-based foods translated into fewer heart problems in a new study.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data collected from more than 10,000 middle-aged U.S. adults who were followed from 1987 through 2016. None had...

How Does Meth Trigger Heart Disease? New Research Offers Clues

THURSDAY, Aug. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Autopsies have uncovered new insight into how the illegal drug methamphetamine harms the heart.

Preliminary findings presented Thursday at an American Heart Association meeting, in Boston, suggest that meth triggers a buildup of tough protein fibers known as collagen in the heart muscle.

Previous autopsy studies have noted injury t...

One Gene Change 2 Million Years Ago Left Humans Vulnerable to Heart Attack

MONDAY, July 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As far as scientists know, humans are the only species that get heart attacks linked to clogged arteries.

Now, new research suggests that just one DNA change occurring 2 to 3 million years ago may be to blame.

The finding might give insight into how to prevent and treat the attacks, according to researchers at the University of Calif...

Dirty Air Kills 30,000 Americans Each Year

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite improved air quality since the 1990s, pollution still causes lung disease, heart attacks and strokes that kill more than 30,000 Americans each year, a new study estimates.

Researchers looked at concentrations of fine pollution particles known as PM2.5 across the country from 1999 to 2015. These tiny particles -- 30 times smaller than...

Higher Cost of New Cholesterol Drugs Putting Patients at Risk: Study

TUESDAY, July 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attacks, strokes and other heart problems are more likely in high-risk patients denied access to cutting-edge cholesterol-busting drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors, a new study reports.

Patients are 16% more likely to have a heart-related health crisis if their PCSK9 prescription is rejected than if it is covered and filled for a year, ac...

Testosterone Therapy May Threaten the Heart

TUESDAY, July 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking testosterone might sound like a good idea for an older man, but a new study suggests the treatment might be bad news for his heart.

Men who took it showed a slightly increased risk of heart attack and stroke in the first few years.

"Our findings show that the use of [testosterone therapy] was associated with an increased risk...

The 'Bottom' Blood Pressure Number Matters, Too

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to blood pressure readings, the "top" number seems to grab all the attention.

But a large, new study confirms that both numbers are, in fact, critical in determining the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Blood pressure measurements are given as a "top" and "bottom" number. The first reflects systolic blood pressure, th...

Can a Broken Heart Contribute to Cancer?

WEDNESDAY, July 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Broken heart syndrome" may harm more than just the heart, new research suggests.

While the extreme stress of losing a loved one has been linked to heart troubles in prior research, a new study found that one in six people with broken heart syndrome also had cancer. Even worse, they were less likely to survive their cancer five years after ...

CPR Less Likely for Black Kids in Poor Neighborhoods: Study

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac arrest is rare in children. But a new study finds that if it does happen, kids are less likely to get life-saving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if they're black and living in a poor neighborhood.

In fact, these kids were much less likely to receive CPR from a bystander than white children living in any type of neighborhood, th...

No Amount of Running Is Too Hard on Your Heart

THURSDAY, July 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ultramarathons are grueling races that typically range anywhere from 30 to 100 miles, but new research suggests that even these distances don't tax the heart unduly.

"The good news is that while experienced runners pushed their heart limits during the ultramarathon, they did not show evidence of cardiac risk assessed through elevated biomark...

More Americans Are Eating Whole Grains, But Intake Still Too Low

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The popularity of heart-healthy whole grains is on the rise among Americans, but levels are still far below those recommended by nutritionists, a new report shows.

Overall, whole grains -- products with 100% whole grains or made with whole grain flour -- made up almost 16% of total grain intake on any given day in 2016.

That'...

In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests May Be a 'Major Public Health Problem'

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many more U.S. hospital patients suffer cardiac arrest than previously thought, a new study reveals.

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart stops beating. It differs from a heart attack, in which blood flow to the heart is blocked.

This new analysis concluded that there are about 38% more adult cases and 18% more cases in child...

Soy's Heart Benefits Hold Steady Over Time, Review Finds

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration might soon revoke soy's longstanding claim to boost cardiovascular health.

But now comes long-term research that appears to bolster the notion that soy does indeed do a heart good.

Canadian researchers pored over the results of 46 separate trials. Their conclusion: "These data strongly support th...

Where a Woman's Fat Lies Hints at Future Heart Troubles

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're an older woman, your heart disease risk might be shaped by the shape of your body.

Researchers report that if you look more like an apple than a pear, your chances of heart trouble are heightened, even if you are a normal weight.

Interestingly, women who carried their weight in their legs had a significantly lower ri...

TV Watching May Be Most Unhealthy Type of Sitting: Study

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Next time you're ready to hit the sofa for an evening of TV, think twice -- it just might kill you.

Though too much sitting has long been linked to health risks, a new study suggests all sitting isn't the same -- and sitting in front of the TV after dinner for long hours at a stretch is especially unhealthy.

In fact, those who di...

Young Female Smokers at Especially High Heart Risk

MONDAY, June 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases the risk of heart attack in all people, but much more so in young women, a new study shows.

British researchers examined data on more than 3,300 cases of acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) that occurred in the Yorkshire region of England between January 2009 and July 2014.

STEMI is sometimes ca...

Statins May Lower Risk of Stroke After Cancer Radiotherapy

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Radiation treatment for cancer can damage the heart and blood vessels, increasing the risk for a stroke or heart attack. But a new study suggests cholesterol-lowering drugs can significantly reduce that risk.

The researchers reported that taking statins may lower the risk of a stroke after radiation treatment by 32%.

"Our stud...

Vitamin D Supplements May Not Help Your Heart

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're looking to improve your heart health, getting regular exercise and eating healthy foods can definitely help, but new research says popping a daily vitamin D supplement won't.

The research -- a meta-analysis of 21 randomized clinical trials involving more than 83,000 people -- found no decrease in major cardiovascular events in pe...

Ailing Heart Can Speed the Brain's Decline, Study Finds

MONDAY, June 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The strong link between brain health and heart health is reinforced in a new study. The research showed that as cardiovascular health falters, so too does thinking and memory.

In one of the largest and longest studies of its kind to date, researchers studied a group of nearly 8,000 people in the United Kingdom. The participants were over 49 y...

Overweight Kids Are at Risk for High Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight preschoolers have twice the odds of developing high blood pressure by age 6, putting them at risk of heart attack and stroke later in life.

And those odds begin building as early as age 4, a new study reports.

"The myth that excess weight in children has no consequences hampers the prevention and control of this health pro...

'Double-Edged Sword': Lung Cancer Radiation Rx May Raise Heart Attack Risk

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Radiation treatment for lung cancer can help extend lives, but it might also raise a patient's odds for heart attacks and heart failure, a new study shows.

Many patients may have no choice but to accept the risk: For about half of people diagnosed with the number one cancer killer, radiation remains the only viable treatment, the research te...

Gene Test Might Someday Gauge Your Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Can a DNA test predict a person's future heart health? Perhaps, researchers say.

A team of Canadian researchers found that by analyzing a person's entire genome, it might be possible to predict their future heart disease risk.

The so-called "polygenic risk score" analysis looks for key heart disease indicators -- genetic "biomark...

High Blood Pressure at Doctor's Office May Be More Dangerous Than Suspected

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you dread seeing the doctor and your blood pressure reading always seems to be high at the doctor's office, a new review says you should take those elevated readings seriously.

The problem is called white-coat hypertension (because of doctors' traditional white coats) and it may signal an underlying problem.

The research defined...

How Your Marital Status Affects Your Odds of Dying From Heart Disease

FRIDAY, June 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Your gender and marital status hold telling clues about your risk of dying of heart disease, a large British study suggests.

It found that widowed and divorced men have significantly higher odds of death due to heart disease than women of the same marital status. But single men are more likely to survive heart failure than single women.

...

ACA's Medicaid Expansion May Have Lowered Heart Disease Deaths

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research supports the notion that Obamacare has improved the health of Americans: State expansions in Medicaid appear to have cut the number of deaths from heart disease.

Counties in states with expanded Medicaid experienced an average of four fewer deaths from heart disease per 100,000 people than states that didn't accept the expansion...

HIV Patients More Likely to Have Heart Troubles, But Less Access to Care

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In what amounts to a double whammy for those living with HIV, a new American Heart Association scientific statement says these patients face higher heart risks but also major barriers to health care.

Three-quarters of people in the United States with HIV are older than 45 and have significant health problems at earlier ages than people without...

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