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The Benefits of Family Dinner

Want to help your teens eat better? Here's one important tip.

Health News Results - 98

'Self-Silencing' Can Be Potentially Deadly for Women

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Do you rarely express anger at those close to you? Is it difficult for you to reveal negative feelings in your relationships?

New research suggests that might make you more vulnerable to having a stroke.

In a study of women aged 40 to 60, those who suffered from "self-silencing" had an increased risk of having plaque in their carot...

A Good Reason to Stop Squabbling at Home

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Few families are able to escape squabbles completely, whether between spouses, children or other relatives.

But a Danish study that looked at nearly 10,000 men and women, aged 36 to 52, warns that stressful social relations can be more than just unpleasant -- they can increase your overall risk of early death.

How can you live in ...

Nurturing Childhood Boosts Odds of a Happy Adult Life: Study

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who grow up confident that their parents, friends and community have their back are far less likely to struggle with depression or other serious mental health issues as adults, new research indicates.

The survey of nearly 6,200 adults also found that bad experiences, such as emotional or physical abuse, don't inevitably doom kids to a dif...

AHA News: Time With Grandkids Could Boost Health – Even Lifespan

FRIDAY, Aug. 30, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Julie Brogan's granddaughters, ages 9, 12 and 13, spend part of every summer at her home overlooking Lake Michigan in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. They enjoy paddle boarding, swimming and working on projects in the professional painter's art studio.

Their experiences have mirrored what scientific researchers have found: Spending ...

New Study Finds a Family Risk for Blood Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If a close relative has had blood cancer, you're more likely to get it, a large new study reports.

The researchers analyzed data from 16 million people in Sweden, including more than 153,000 diagnosed with blood cancer and more than 391,000 of their first-degree relatives: parents, siblings or children.

Patients with a family link ...

Opioid Epidemic Doubled Number of U.S. Kids Sent to Foster Care

MONDAY, July 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The opioid epidemic appears to be literally tearing families apart.

Children are being taken out of their homes at alarming rates because their parents are abusing drugs, a new study shows.

The number of kids placed in foster care in the United States due to parental drug use has more than doubled over the past two decades, rising to...

Ageism Disappears When Young and Old Spend Time Together

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ageism is pervasive throughout society, and harmful to young and old alike. But a new study finds some simple steps can help erase it.

Mixing younger and older people in various settings, combined with educating younger people about the aging process and its misconceptions, works quickly to reduce ageism, the new research indicates.

...

White House Immigration Proposal May Harm Health of 1.9 Million Kids

MONDAY, July 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 2 million children could lose out on vital public health care and food assistance due to a proposed Trump administration rule change related to U.S. immigration, a new study argues.

As many as 1.9 million children with specific medical problems are projected to drop out of federal health and nutrition benefit programs if the administrati...

Connected Teens Become Healthier Adults

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who feel connected with others at home and school have fewer serious health problems and risks as young adults, a new study suggests.

Young adults who had higher levels of connectedness -- feeling engaged, supported and cared for at home and at school -- when they were teens were as much as 66% less likely to have mental health probl...

Many Lesbian, Gay Teens Still Face Rejection by Parents

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents of lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) children take years to adjust after learning about their sexual orientation, a new study finds.

The study included more than 1,200 parents of LGB youth aged 10 to 25. The parents visited a website with LGB resources and were asked to complete a questionnaire.

Of those parents, 26%...

'Dad Shaming' Is Real, Survey Shows

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's not just Moms: Just ahead of Father's Day, a new survey finds that about half of American dads say they've been criticized about their parenting styles.

The way they enforced discipline topped the list of things naysayers called them to task on, with two-thirds of critiques focused on that subject.

Forty-four percent of the ...

When Fido Comes Along on Your Vacation

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Summertime is vacation time, and plenty of people bring their pets along on their adventure, so one expert offers tips on how to make the trip fun for all.

"Before attempting a car ride, acclimate your pet to the harness or crate," said Kit Darling, infection control coordinator at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedi...

How to Put Limits on Your Family's Screen Time

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While kids get some benefit from using digital and social media, such as early learning and exposure to new ideas, too much of it can negatively affect their health, sleep and eating habits, and even their attention span.

But ruling out all media usage isn't the answer either.

An approach suggested by the American Academy of Pediatri...

Team Sports Could Help Traumatized Kids Grow Into Healthy Adults

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Coming from a broken home or suffering abuse can traumatize a child, but new research suggests team sports might be just the medicine these kids need.

Tracking U.S. health data from nearly 10,000 people, researchers found that teens who experienced childhood trauma and played team sports had lower odds of depression and anxiety as young adul...

For People With Heart Failure, Loneliness Can Mean Worse Care

TUESDAY, May 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than 1 in 10 heart failure patients follow lifestyle treatment recommendations, and a new study suggests that loneliness is a major reason why.

Polish researchers assessed 475 heart failure patients' compliance with a regimen of restricting salt and fluid intake, being physically active, and weighing themselves each day.

Only 7...

Thriving in a Multi-Generational Home

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're part of a multi-generational home, you're in good company. The number of Americans living with two or more adult generations of one family rose during the last recession and has grown to an all-time high during the recovery.

More than 64 million Americans live in a multi-generational home, according to a census analysis by the Pew ...

Many Drug Abusers Use Family Members to 'Opioid Shop'

FRIDAY, May 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who are thwarted in their attempts to "shop around" for prescription opioid painkillers at doctors' offices and pharmacies may try to get the drugs via relatives as a last resort, researchers report.

Some people who misuse opioids go to numerous prescribers and fill prescriptions at multiple pharmacies to avoid detection. But states are ...

E-Cigarettes Used in 5% of U.S. Homes With Kids

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As e-cigarettes gain fans, children may be losing out. New research suggests that vaping parents expose children to secondhand fumes that may be as harmful as tobacco smoke.

Nearly 5% of U.S. adults living with children use e-cigarettes, according to the study. And many of those kids have asthma.

"Although e-cigarette aerosols are...

How to Tame Morning Chaos

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Are your mornings always chaotic? Between making breakfast, packing lunches, getting everyone dressed and hunting for homework assignments, it's easy to feel like you've put in a day's worth of work before 9 a.m.

The answer is to start the night before, with kids and parents picking out the next day's clothes and filling backpacks and...

Untrained Caregivers Bear Burden of Care for Families: Report

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty million largely self-taught home caregivers in the United States perform complex medical tasks for family members and friends, a new report says.

That means that half of the nation's 40 million family caregivers do things typically performed by health care professionals, such as giving injections, preparing special diets, handling tu...

Caregiving May Not Be as Taxing to Your Health as Feared

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being a family caregiver may not be as hazardous to your health as most people think, researchers say.

Decades of research papers and media reports have warned that family caregivers are at risk for health declines. One suggested reason is that the stress of caregiving can increase inflammation and weaken the immune system.

For this...

Kids With Autism 'In Tune' With Mom's Feelings: Study

THURSDAY, March 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism may have trouble interpreting facial emotions in strangers, but research finds some are as "in-tune" with their mother's expressions as kids without autism.

The study included 4- to 8-year-olds with and without autism who viewed five facial expressions -- happy, sad, angry, fearful and neutral -- on both familiar and un...

Does Having Kids Make Couples Happier? New Study Says Yes, But …

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Bringing home a bundle of joy really can make your life better, as long as money isn't too tight, new research suggests.

Previous studies have found that having children might reduce adults' happiness.

In the new study, researchers analyzed data from surveys of 1 million adults in Europe between 2009 and 2018. Respondents were aske...

Strengthening Family Ties Through Online Gaming

THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Video games provide unlimited entertainment, and interactive ones can even help you burn off calories.

But you may not know that playing games -- either in person or through shared online networks -- can unite family members from many generations in meaningful ways.

Researchers at Concordia University in Montreal found that playin...

Cost Puts Sports, Art Programs Out of Reach for Many Families

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- After-school activities help develop social skills and talent, but a new report finds that many kids are priced out of participating.

In fact, for 1 in 6 middle and high school students, costs are the prime reason for not taking part in these activities. And the poorest students are two times less likely to participate, compared with their b...

Burden of Autism in Teens Weighs Heaviest on Minorities, Poor

FRIDAY, March 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Autism exacts a heavy toll on the families of teens who struggle with the disorder, but the fight to get treatment and services is even harder among minorities who live in poverty, new research suggests.

"We must understand that many families parenting teens on the autism spectrum are also struggling to make ends meet while trying to navigate...

1 in 3 Young Adults Suffers From Loneliness in U.S.

MONDAY, March 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For young adults, drugs and distracted driving are well-recognized health threats. Far less attention is paid to loneliness.

But loneliness is common -- and it is a particular problem for people aged 18 to 24, a new study suggests.

"We have this stereotype of the lonely old person in poor health, and the robust, socially active youn...

Coping With Diabetes Is a Family Affair

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When Giuseppina Miller's 8-year-old son, Peter, was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, he necessarily got a lot of his parents' attention.

"We tried to adjust pretty well, but I was getting no sleep because I had to check his blood sugar in the middle of the night, and I was worried all the time. My two younger daughters felt the stress and...

Prenatal Vitamins Might Lower Risk of Second Child With Autism

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Something as simple as taking prenatal vitamins during the first month of pregnancy might lower the odds of having a second child with autism.

As researchers explain in a new report, once one child has been diagnosed with autism, any subsequent children face a higher risk of having the developmental disorder.

But the study found t...

Long Work Weeks May Be Depressing, Especially for Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Feeling trapped behind a desk, a counter or on the factory floor does no favors for the mind.

Now, research helps confirm that women with jobs that demand long hours may be more prone to depression.

Researchers found that compared with women who worked a standard 40-hour week, those who were on the clock 55 hours or more typically r...

One Plus of Texting, Social Media: Divorce Made Easier on Kids

TUESDAY, Feb. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's lots to be concerned about when it comes to kids and modern forms of communication, such as social isolation and cyberbullying.

But a new study reports a bright side to all that texting and social media -- it keeps children connected to their parents after a divorce.

The researchers also found that when kids and the parent n...

Too Often, Opioid Abuse Runs in the Family, Study Shows

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When parents abuse prescription painkillers, their teenagers may follow their example, a new study finds.

The study of thousands of U.S. teenagers found that kids were 30 percent more likely to abuse prescription opioids if one of their parents had.

The results mirror what's been seen in past studies of substance use, including cigar...

Does Bullying Start at Home?

THURSDAY, Feb. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you think that sibling rivalry can border on brutality at times, you won't be surprised by new research from British scientists.

They found that children are more likely to be bullied by a sibling if they have more than one, and firstborn children and older brothers are most likely to bully siblings, a new study finds.

"Sibling ...

Moms, Are You Victims of 'Invisible Labor'?

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers not only take on the lion's share of physical chores, they also shoulder most of the "invisible labor" involved in making sure the household is humming along, new research suggests.

Going beyond cooking and laundry, this means the mental strain of making sure there's enough food for bag lunches, teacher meetings are on the calendar, ...

Nature or Nurture? Twins Study Helps Sort Out Genes' Role in Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Two of every five common diseases are at least partially influenced by a person's genetics, the largest U.S. study of twins ever conducted finds.

Nearly 40 percent of 560 different diseases have a genetic component, while 25 percent are driven by environmental factors shared by twins who are growing up in the same household, the researchers re...

Look to Your Aunts, Uncles and Parents for Clues to Your Longevity

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Your chances of inheriting genes linked to longevity are highest if you come from a family with many long-lived members, researchers say.

And that includes aunts and uncles, not just parents.

Using databases at the University of Utah and in the Dutch province of Zeeland, investigators analyzed the genealogies of nearly 315,000 people...

What Makes for a Good Nursing Home?

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Families of nursing home residents are more likely to be satisfied with facilities that have higher staffing levels and are nonprofits, a new study finds.

"The findings show that facility-level factors associated with higher family satisfaction are rather similar to the ones we already know predict resident satisfaction as well," said study le...

How to Handle Holiday Stressors

TUESDAY, Dec. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While others are decking the halls, many people find the holidays trigger anxiety and depression.

Stress can arise from financial strain, dealing with difficult relatives or trying to create the perfect holiday, said Michelle Martel, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Kentucky.

Also, the holidays can bring up ...

3 in 4 Americans Struggle With Loneliness

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Folks feeling lonely as the holidays approach have a lot of company, a new study suggests.

Loneliness appears to be widespread among Americans, affecting three out of every four people, researchers have found.

Further, loneliness appears to spike at specific times during adulthood. Your late 20s, mid-50s and late 80s are times when ...

Autism, ADHD in One Child Tied to Raised Risk in Siblings

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are so closely linked that they not only run in families, but each increases the risk of the other in future siblings, a new study finds.

Younger siblings of children with autism have a 30-fold increased relative risk they'll be diagnosed with autism themselves. They're also nearly fou...

Family, School Support May Help Stop Bullies in Their Tracks

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children with strong family ties and school support are more likely to try to stop bullying when they see it, new research suggests.

The study included 450 sixth-graders and 446 ninth-graders who were asked about their relationships with their family, friends and teachers.

The students were then presented with six scenarios of specif...

Health Surrogates Often in Dark About Loved One's Wishes

TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Few people entrusted with making difficult health care decisions for older loved ones actually know what the patient would want, a new study contends.

"Advance care planning cannot focus on the patient alone. The health care agent has to be brought into the conversation," said study leader Dr. Terri Fried, a professor of medicine at Yale Univ...

When You Go From a Family of 3 to a Family of 4

FRIDAY, Nov. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Wondering if having a second child will affect your marriage even more than baby number one did?

There's no doubt that having a baby and changing from a couple into a family requires a lot of adjustment. But research shows that the adjustment period that follows a second child typically isn't as long.

For...

Family Meals Make for Teens Who Eat Healthy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Want your teenager to eat better? Have more family meals, even if your family isn't particularly close, new research suggests.

"Gathering around the dinner table is sort of a magical thing," said lead researcher Kathryn Walton, a dietitian and Ph.D. student at the University of Guelph in Canada.

"It's a time when families can slow...

Kids Get Caught in Deadly Cross-Fire of Domestic Violence

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty percent of homicides of U.S. children ages 2 to 14 years are related to intimate partner violence, a new study indicates.

That's double the rate in the National Violent Death Reporting System, according to Harvard School of Public Health researchers.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on nearly 1,400 children in 1...

Murder of Family, Friends Takes Highest Toll on Black Teens

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who lose a family member or friend to murder have an increased risk of suicide, and black teens are most likely to face this kind of heartbreak, a new study finds.

University of Pittsburgh researchers analyzed the results of a 2014 survey of just over 1,600 teens, aged 14 to 19, in Allegheny County and found that 13 percent said a frien...

Think Genes Dictate Your Life Span? Think Again

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your life partner has a much greater influence on your longevity than the genes you inherited from your family, according to a new analysis of the family trees of more than 400 million people.

"While it is a widely held belief that life span heritability ranges from approximately 15 to 30 percent, the findings discussed in this paper demonstra...

More Americans Are Raising Their Grandkids

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More than 3 million older Americans are now raising their grandchildren as their own, even as they struggle with health problems and financial stresses, a new survey shows.

Not only that, the children they take in are more likely to be troubled as they struggle to adjust to new lives, the researchers found.

Still, these grandparents s...

Many U.S. Parents Share Leftover Antibiotics: Survey

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An "alarming" number of American parents save unused antibiotics and give them to family members and other people, a new study finds.

This type of misuse helps fuel antibiotic resistance, the study authors said. Their report is scheduled for presentation Monday in Orlando, Fla., at the national conference of the American Academy of Pediatrics (...

Bigger Family, Lower Cancer Risk?

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you come from a large family, you may have a lower risk of cancer, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from 178 countries and found that people from larger families were less likely to get cancer than those from smaller families.

The link between family size and cancer risk was "independent of income, levels of urbani...

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