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Health News Results - 530

'Lost Wallet' Test Reveals How Honest People Are

THURSDAY, June 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you tend to doubt the honesty of strangers, the results of a new study may come as a surprise: All around the globe, people are more likely to return a lost wallet if it's loaded with cash.

In experiments done in 40 countries, researchers found that people were more likely to return a lost wallet to its owner if it contained a large amoun...

Kindergarten Behavior Linked to Life Earnings in Study

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Believe it or not, how your kid acts in kindergarten might impact his earning potential years later, a new study suggests.

Canadian researchers found that boys and girls who were identified by their kindergarten teachers as inattentive earned nearly $1,300 less a year than their more focused peers.

Additionally, boys identified ...

Vitamin D Supplements May Not Help Your Heart

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you're looking to improve your heart health, getting regular exercise and eating healthy foods can definitely help, but new research says popping a daily vitamin D supplement won't.

The research -- a meta-analysis of 21 randomized clinical trials involving more than 83,000 people -- found no decrease in major cardiovascular events in pe...

Many Lesbian, Gay Teens Still Face Rejection by Parents

WEDNESDAY, June 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents of lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) children take years to adjust after learning about their sexual orientation, a new study finds.

The study included more than 1,200 parents of LGB youth aged 10 to 25. The parents visited a website with LGB resources and were asked to complete a questionnaire.

Of those parents, 26%...

Help for Impotence Starts With Frank Talk With Doctor

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Erectile dysfunction is often treatable, but many men hesitate to discuss it with their doctor.

What's more, doctors don't often bring it up with their patients, according to Dr. Susan MacDonald, a urological surgeon at Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center.

"I think it's because of the stigma attached to it," she said.

Why Do Young Women Get Addicted to Indoor Tanning?

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of depression and genetic risk may fuel an addiction to indoor tanning.

That's the conclusion of a new study out of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C.

For the study, researchers surveyed nearly 300 women who used indoor tanning beds, sunlamps or sun booths, and analyzed DNA samples. Th...

2 Hours/Week in Nature: Your Prescription for Better Health?

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Spending just a couple of hours a week enjoying nature may do your body and mind some good, a new study suggests.

The study, of nearly 20,000 adults in England, found that people who spent at least two hours outdoors in the past week gave higher ratings to their physical health and mental well-being.

There could, of course, be many...

Scared Safe: Pics of Sun's Damage to Face Boost Sunscreen Use

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When all else fails, fear may motivate people to protect themselves from the sun.

Researchers found that a photo of a mole being removed and visuals of skin damage did the trick.

Study volunteers were shown photos taken using a VISIA UV camera system. These images spotlight skin damage from the sun's ultraviolet rays that is norm...

'Dad Shaming' Is Real, Survey Shows

WEDNESDAY, June 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's not just Moms: Just ahead of Father's Day, a new survey finds that about half of American dads say they've been criticized about their parenting styles.

The way they enforced discipline topped the list of things naysayers called them to task on, with two-thirds of critiques focused on that subject.

Forty-four percent of the ...

What and How You Eat Affects Your Odds for Type 2 Diabetes

SATURDAY, June 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The kind of foods you eat, and even the order in which you eat them can affect your odds of developing type 2 diabetes, three new studies suggest.

The studies -- being presented to the American Society for Nutrition -- found:

  • Switching to a mostly plant-based diet (but one that could still include m...

Sugary Sodas Still Popular, But Warnings, Taxes Can Curb Uptake

SUNDAY, June 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eight of every 10 American households buys sodas and other sugary drinks each week, adding up to 2,000 calories per household per week, new research shows.

To put that in perspective, 2,000 calories is equal to the recommended average caloric intake for an adult for an entire day.

With the obesity epidemic ...

Instagram 'Self-Harm' Posts Give Rise to Copycat Behavior

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being an Instagram influencer isn't always a good thing. New research found that vulnerable young people who see online posts of self-harm -- like cutting -- may copy those destructive behaviors.

Almost one-third of teens and young adults who reported seeing self-harm posts on Instagram said they had performed the same or similar self-harming...

Lesbian, Gay Youth at Higher Risk for Self-Harm

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An alarming number of teens practice self-harm, but lesbian, gay and bisexual teens may be more than twice as likely as their straight peers to cut, hit or bruise themselves, new research warns.

While between 10% and 20% of heterosexual teens engaged in these dangerous behaviors, 38% to 53% of lesbian, gay and bisexual teens did...

The Dangers of Being a People-Pleaser

MONDAY, June 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being thoughtful and caring are great qualities to have, but if you go out of your way to get people to like you, you could be a people-pleaser, with unfortunate consequences for your own well-being.

If you're always saying yes to others, you're likely giving up time spent on things that really matter to you. If you're always acting in a way t...

Financial Disaster May Prompt Self-Destructive Behavior

FRIDAY, May 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If England's 2008 financial crisis was any indication, self-harm often follows economic ruin.

Researchers examined self-poisoning (which largely means drug overdoses) and self-injury events in three British cities and found that one-quarter of all self-harm emergency department visits were made by men and women aged 40 to 59.

Risk of...

Many Feel 'Frozen' When Heart Attack Strikes

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When a heart attack occurs, delaying treatment by even a few minutes could be deadly.

But many people wait hours after symptoms set in to get care -- either because they feel mentally "frozen" and unable to act, or because they're slow to recognize the seriousness of the situation, a new survey reveals.

The finding stems from a look...

Colon Cancer Striking More Under 50, and More Often in Western States

WEDNESDAY, May 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Colon cancer rates among those under 50 in the United States are rising, and they're rising the most rapidly in western states, a new study finds.

"It was surprising that the largest increases were in the West, where you have more healthy behaviors," said lead researcher Rebecca Siegel, scientific director of surveillance research at the Am...

How to Prevent Sneaky Summer Weight Gain

MONDAY, May 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of summer vacation -- a season of potato salad, ice cream and, if you're not careful, unwanted weight gain.

But it is possible to avoid packing on the pounds. Just hop on the scale every day, researchers suggest.

The new study included 111 U.S. adults, who weighed themselves every day from mid...

Poor Diet Might Raise Your Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Your unhealthy eating habits could increase your risk of cancer as much as drinking alcohol can, new research reports.

The Tufts University study found that poor diets cause about the same number of cancer cases as alcohol consumption does in the United States.

The researchers said their modeling study estimated that dietary factor...

AHA News: Need a Break? A Vacation Really Can Be Good for You -- If It's Done Right

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Need another reason to take that vacation? It's probably good for your heart and mind.

Research over the years has suggested that holidays -- and breaking away from a stressful daily routine -- reap more than just scenic photos and souvenirs.

One of the most-cited studies, the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Tr...

Earlier Bedtimes Help Kids Fight Obesity

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- With childhood obesity rates high, many studies have investigated lifestyle factors that can make a difference -- which ones increase the risk and which ones reduce it.

Beyond diet, a lack of sleep has been linked to weight gain both in adults and children, so it's important that kids get enough shuteye, even with their -- and your -- busy sc...

Suicides Increase Among U.S. Kids, But More in Girls Than Boys

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide rates are on the rise among American children, but the increase is greatest among girls, a new study finds.

"Overall, we found a disproportionate increase in female youth suicide rates compared to males, resulting in a narrowing of the gap between male and female suicide rates," said study author Donna Ruch. She is a postdoctoral resear...

When E-Cig Makers Offer Promotional Items, More Teens Likely to Vape

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Coupons, samples, branded hats and T-shirts: When teens use or wear promotional items from companies that make alternative tobacco products like electronic cigarettes, they are more likely to try those products, new research shows.

The study included 757 California teens, aged 13 to 19, who were followed for a year. At the beginning of the year...

What to Do When Your Child Throws a Fit

FRIDAY, May 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know the scenario -- your child has a meltdown, leaving you frustrated, embarrassed and arguing even though your brain says it's a battle you're not likely to win.

Tantrums often start during the "terrible 2's" because little ones can't yet clearly voice their frustrations. But it's never too late to correct the behavior, even if it's a wel...

Are Diets High in Processed Foods a Recipe for Obesity?

THURSDAY, May 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have long believed the obesity epidemic is at least partly related to the proliferation of highly processed foods. Now, new research suggests the connection is real.

In a tightly controlled lab study, scientists found that people ate many more calories -- and gained a couple of pounds -- when they spent two weeks on a highly proce...

Millennials Believe 'Narcissist' Label, But Don't Like It

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young Americans tend to accept the popular notion that their generation is self-centered and entitled, but they also resent those labels, new research suggests.

In a series of surveys, researchers found that most people -- regardless of age -- believed the narcissistic stereotype often assigned to millennials and Generation Z.

Youn...

2 of 3 Parents Read Texts While Driving

MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite countless public service messages warning against texting and driving, more than two-thirds of parents have read a text while behind the wheel and roughly half have written a text while driving, a new survey finds.

Millennial parents were more likely to report distracted driving behaviors, such as reading a text. But both millennial pa...

Body Adapts, Recovers From Occasional 'Pigging Out,' Study Finds

MONDAY, May 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's almost time for long summer weekends and backyard barbecues. And you may be wondering if a day or two of burgers and beers does any long-term damage to your body.

A new Australian study suggests that if you normally have a healthy lifestyle, you can relax and enjoy the feasts. The study found that the body adapts and quickly bounces back f...

Anger a Threat to Health in Old Age

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The loss of loved ones can hit the elderly particularly hard, but a new study suggests it's anger, and not sadness, that may damage the aging body more.

Anger can increase inflammation, which is linked with conditions such as heart disease, cancer and arthritis, the researchers said.

"As most people age, they simply cannot do the act...

Want to Save Money While Shopping? Leave Your Phone Home

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Everyone knows about cellphones and the threat of distracted driving. But how about distracted shopping?

Using your cellphone while shopping might make you susceptible to buying stuff you didn't intend to buy, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that people who used cellphones while shopping were more likely to forget what they we...

Three Ways to Improve Focus and Concentration

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Do you get distracted easily or find that it's getting harder to stay focused on a task at hand or retain new information? These issues can happen to anyone, though they may seem to be more troublesome with advancing age.

But concentration is an ability that you can improve with a few simple "study skills."

For instance, when someone ...

Developmental Tests Might Spot Autism at Even Younger Ages

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The sooner a child with autism is diagnosed, the better, and now new research describes a novel way of catching it earlier than ever.

Well-child visits that include developmental screening might pick up the first hints of autism risk in some children, the study suggests.

"We think this has the potential to identify children at risk fo...

As Finals Draw Near, College Kids' Diets Worsen

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Up all night, stressing out, feeling pressured. Cramming for college finals can bring all that, plus have students reaching for fatty, sugary foods, a new study suggests.

"Stress has long been implicated in poor diet. People tend to report overeating and comfort eating foods high in fat, sugar and calories in times of stress," said study leader ...

Treatments Targeting Social Behavior Hormone Show Promise With Autism

WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hormone-based treatment might improve social function in people with autism, a pair of new clinical trials suggests.

Both focused on vasopressin, a hormone that has been implicated in the brain's ability to manage social behavior.

In the first trial, vasopressin given as a nasal spray helped improve social responsiveness in kids wit...

'Microbiome' May Be Key to Autism Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, May 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The belly-brain connection is gaining traction in autism research. And a new study suggests gut bacteria may play a role in the disorder or some of its symptoms.

Although this research is in its infancy, it's hoped that someday scientists might tweak the gut bacteria to ease digestive symptoms of autism spectrum disorder.

The latest...

Young Adults Flocking to Energy Drinks

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- More young Americans than ever are turning to caffeinated energy drinks, and the trend is cause for concern, researchers say.

In a new study, investigators found a significant increase in energy drink consumption among teens, and young and middle-aged adults over the past decade.

Compared to people who didn't consume the beverages,...

Autism Diagnoses Reliable at 14 Months, Study Finds

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Although autism is typically diagnosed around age 3 or 4, new research suggests it can be spotted soon after a child's first birthday.

Diagnosing autism spectrum disorders early is "extremely important because the brain is really plastic during early development," said the study's lead author, Karen Pierce.

The study found that 8...

Wellness Programs Take Hold in American Workplaces

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of U.S. workplaces now offer wellness programs, a new study finds.

"Most American adults work, and many spend half or more of their waking hours at work," said study author Laura Linnan. She's a professor in the department of health behavior at the University of North Carolina's School of Global Public Health.

"Wher...

Americans Sitting More Than Ever, and Tech Is to Blame

TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- America's couch potatoes are becoming ever more deeply rooted, and computers are the reason why.

The amount of time people spend sitting around has increased in recent years, driven largely by more leisure time spent with a computer, federal survey data shows.

Total daily sitting time increased about an hour a day for teenagers an...

Sit All Day at Work? Exercise Can Counter That

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If your job keeps you chained to a desk all day, you might be able to erase the ill effects with regular exercise, a large new study suggests.

Research has shown that people who spend a lot of time sitting may pay for it with a higher heart disease risk and a shorter lifespan. But the new study, of nearly 150,000 adults, indicates you can avo...

Many Teens Don't Know They Are Vaping Nicotine

MONDAY, April 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As e-cigarette use soars in high schools across America, new research shows many people don't understand the amount of addictive nicotine they're inhaling with every puff.

In a new survey, many teens said they regularly used e-cigarettes, but swore they only vaped nicotine-free products.

However, urine tests for a "marker" of nicoti...

Can't Work Out During the Week? 'Weekend Warriors' Still Benefit

THURSDAY, April 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Daily exercise may be the ideal, but even weekend workouts might prolong your life, a new study suggests.

In a study of more than 3,400 men and women over age 40, researchers found those who exercised one or two days a week had the same low death rates as those who exercised more frequently.

"One of the main concerns to increasin...

More TV, Tablets, More Attention Issues at Age 5

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Five-year-olds who spend more than two hours a day in front of a smartphone or tablet may be at risk of attention problems, a new study suggests.

Excessive "screen time" among children has been the subject of much research -- particularly now that even the youngest kids are staring at phones and iPads every day.

The American Acad...

Celebrity 'Fat-Shaming' Affects All Women, Study Finds

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You've probably seen headlines screaming that a favorite star is packing on the pounds. Tyra Banks, Jessica Simpson, Jennifer Lawrence -- no matter how thin, no celebrity seems immune from "fat-shaming."

Now, research shows the trend could have a ripple effect, making the non-famous feel bad about their bodies, too.

"Fat-shaming is ...

'Added Sugars' Label on Foods Could Save Many Lives

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new Nutrition Facts label that highlights the amount of added sugars in food could prevent nearly 1 million cases of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

The new label, first proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May 2016, adds a new line under the Total Carbohydrate category that details the amount of s...

Don't Prosecute Sexting Teens as Child Pornographers, Researchers Say

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In many U.S. states, teenagers who send "sext" messages to each other can be prosecuted as child pornographers -- and that should end, researchers argue.

Many states have recently passed laws that specifically address teen sexting -- exempting it, to varying degrees, from longstanding child pornography statutes. But in 23 states, those outdat...

Could Treating Gut Bacteria Help Ease Autism Symptoms?

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists suspect that your gut microbiome -- the mix of bacteria that inhabit your intestines -- affects your health in many ways, but a surprising new finding suggests that a healthy microbiome may even ease the symptoms of autism.

The small study of 18 children with autism who also had severe digestive problems found that a fecal transpla...

Suicide Rates Fall When States Raise Minimum Wage: Study

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The link between paychecks and mental health just got a little stronger.

New research suggests that raising the minimum wage might slow the rate of suicides in the United States.

The review of all 50 states found that between 2006 and 2016, increasing a state's minimum wage by a dollar was linked to a decrease in that state's rate o...

Good Sleep a Must for Teens With ADHD

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers tend to shortchange themselves on sleep, but when they have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), that can really hamper their thinking skills, researchers say.

The new study included teen volunteers with ADHD who spent a week in which their sleep was restricted to 6.5 hours per night. That was followed by a week in which...

Suicidal Behavior Nearly Doubles Among U.S. Kids

MONDAY, April 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide attempts and talk about suicide are rising alarmingly among America's kids, with emergency departments seeing a near doubling of cases over less than a decade, a new study reveals.

Among children aged 5 to 18, suicidal thoughts and attempts led to more than 1.1 million ER visits in 2015 -- up from about 580,000 in 2007, according to an...

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Wellness Library Results - 3

By now your child has reached elementary school age and you feel pretty well in tune with his personality -- his shyness is just part of the package. Still, you wonder how you can make life easier for him. The key is to avoid the two opposing -- and perhaps equally strong -- temptations to pressure and overprotect him. Trying to get him to be more outgoing will only make him retreat. And shelterin...

What is attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder? ADHD (commonly known as ADD) is a behavioral disorder. Basically, children who have it are unable to concentrate, excessively active, or both. The American Psychiatric Association calls the distinct types "inattentive" and "hyperactive-impulsivity." Some kids with attention deficit disorder repeatedly fail to finish tasks, get distracted easily, a...

Henri is supposed to help you with this big project the boss requested. He gives you lots of his time and advice. He seems extremely helpful, particularly in correcting mistakes and oversights. You feel fortunate to have his assistance. However, a few days later the boss is giving you an inquisition about all the mistakes you made, how much time it is taking, and questioning the materials you are ...

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