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Health News Results - 559

We All Carry a Personal Cloud of Germs, Chemicals

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You might feel squeaky clean after that morning shower, but you carry an invisible cloud of bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemicals every day.

That's one of the lessons from the first study to take a deep dive into the human "exposome" -- the collection of microbes, plant particles and chemicals that accompanies people as they move through t...

New Ebola Virus Found in Bats

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new Ebola virus species discovered in bats in Sierra Leone has never been detected in sick humans or other animals, a new study shows.

It's the first finding of its type, according to the researchers.

The newly identified species -- called Bombali -- has the potential to infect human cells. But it's not known whether it has alread...

Newer HIV Therapies Yield Big Gains But Racial Gaps Persist

TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Improved treatment has nearly tripled viral suppression rates among HIV patients in the United States over the past two decades, researchers report.

But viral suppression rates remain lower among young people and black Americans, the researchers add.

About 1.2 million U.S. adults have HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Achieving and ...

New Drug of Last Resort Tackles Resistant HIV

THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is typically a manageable infection, but medications that keep the virus at bay don't work for everyone. Now, researchers have developed a new medication to help them.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug -- ibalizumab (Trogarzo) -- in March. Phase 3 trial results were published in the Aug...

Health Woes Hit 1 in 7 Babies Exposed to Zika in U.S. Territories

TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- About 14 percent of babies born in U.S. territories to women infected with Zika have health problems that may be related to the virus, federal officials reported Tuesday.

The babies either had a Zika-associated birth defect or a neurodevelopmental abnormality possibly caused by Zika infection in the womb, researchers with the Centers for Dise...

AHA: Common Virus Causes Heart Defects in Mice

THURSDAY, Aug. 2, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- A virus that infects millions of Americans every year may on occasion cause heart defects during the early stages of pregnancy, a new study in mice suggests. The findings may give researchers further insights into the causes of congenital heart disease.

The effects of the virus, called coxsackievirus B, may not be identical in hu...

Woman May Have Passed on Ebola a Year After Recovery

TUESDAY, July 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new report suggests that people can survive Ebola and still possibly infect others up to a year later.

The finding could mean that continued monitoring for the disease is still necessary after a country has been declared Ebola-free, the researchers said.

The case study involved a family in Liberia, which had more than 4,800 deaths...

Ebola Antibodies Show Protection Potential in Animal Studies

FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Two types of antibodies from the blood of Ebola survivors protected animals against strains of the virus that cause deadly infections in people, researchers report.

It may be possible to use these antibodies to create a treatment for Ebola, the researchers said.

The team, led by Dr. James Crowe of Vanderbilt University Medical Center...

FDA Drops Zika Testing for Blood Donors

FRIDAY, July 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Individual blood donations will no longer need to be tested for the Zika virus, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday.

"When Zika virus first emerged, the unknown course of the epidemic and the observed severe effects from the disease indicated that individual donor testing was needed to ensure the continued safety of the blood supp...

Some California Mosquitoes Can Carry Zika Virus

FRIDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Aedes mosquitoes in California can spread the Zika virus, researchers report.

Laboratory studies have shown that several species of Aedes mosquitoes can transmit Zika, but whether the same species in different regions could spread the virus was unclear. Zika is a relatively mild illness for most people, but it can cause devastati...

Could Herpes Virus Play a Role in Alzheimer's?

THURSDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Viruses could play a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

Brains riddled with Alzheimer's disease contain high levels of two strains of human herpes virus, researchers discovered.

Human herpes virus 6 and 7 were found in Alzheimer's-affected brains at levels up to twice as high as in those with...

Florida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne Virus

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The first confirmed human case of Keystone virus has been diagnosed in a Florida teen, but it's likely that infection with the mosquito-borne disease is common among state residents, researchers report.

The virus can cause a rash and mild fever. It's named after the location in the Tampa Bay area where it was first identified in 1964. It ha...

Who Will and Who Won't Get the Flu?

THURSDAY, June 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors can't yet predict if someone exposed to the flu will become sick. But such predictions may be getting closer to reality, new research hints.

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine say they've identified a "biomarker" that indicates a person's susceptibility to flu viruses.

"We've been after this for about fou...

Humidity Won't Hamper Spread of Flu Virus

THURSDAY, June 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Humidity doesn't hinder the ability of flu viruses to infect people, claims a new study that challenges a long-held belief that the viruses become less active in moist conditions.

The researchers found that mucus and other airway secretions expelled during coughs or sneezes protect flu viruses when they're airborne, regardless of humidity lev...

Human Trials Set for Experimental HIV Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, June 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental HIV vaccine protected animals from dozens of strains of HIV. And a human trial of the vaccine is expected to begin in the second half of 2019, according to U.S. researchers.

The vaccine targets a vulnerable site on HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- and triggered antibody production in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys, accordi...

Could New Pig Virus Pose Threat to People?

WEDNESDAY, May 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new virus found in pigs may pose a threat to people, new research suggests.

Researchers found the virus was able to infect cultured human cells and cells of other species in a lab. The discovery is raising concerns about a potentially dangerous outbreak in the United States.

The pig virus, known as Porcine deltacoronavirus, was ...

Scientists Are Targeting the Common Cold

TUESDAY, May 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- British researchers have developed a molecule they claim could make colds a thing of the past.

In lab tests, this molecule blocked viruses that cause colds and prevented them from taking control of human cells.

"The common cold is an inconvenience for most of us, but can cause serious complications in people with conditions like asth...

Opioid Crisis Means More Newborns With Hepatitis C, But Few Get Tested

WEDNESDAY, May 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the U.S. opioid epidemic, hepatitis C is up among pregnant women, raising the risk for mother-to-child transmission of the virus, a new study reveals.

Hepatitis C can be contracted via dirty needles used by opioid addicts.

But just a fraction of newborns exposed to hepatitis C in the womb are screened for the liver-harming in...

Zika May Linger in Semen for Shorter Period Than Thought: Study

WEDNESDAY, April 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines in place for protecting against the sexual transmission of Zika virus need to be re-evaluated, based on a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC currently recommends that men who have traveled to a Zika-active region either use condoms or abstain from sex for at least 6 months.

But ...

Too Few Baby Boomers Get Hepatitis C Screening

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recommendations, only about one in 10 U.S. baby boomers has been screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV), a new study reveals.

Hepatitis C is a contagious virus that causes nearly half of the cases of liver cancer in the United States. Health officials estimate that about one in 30 Americans born between 1945 and 1965 (the baby boom g...

Detecting Ebola Before Symptoms Show Up

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An immune system response may reveal presence of the deadly Ebola virus before symptoms appear, researchers report.

Currently, there's no way to diagnose Ebola until symptoms show up, which can occur anytime between 2 and 21 days after exposure to the virus, the researchers explained. But by the time symptoms appear, the disease is already...

When Is a Sick Fellow Flier a Health Risk to You?

MONDAY, March 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you worry about catching a nasty infection when you fly, a new study suggests your risk boils down to exactly how close you are to that sick passenger.

A row in front, a row in back, a couple of seats to the side, and your chances of getting sick jump, researchers report.

"Passengers should not, however, worry about getting sick ...

Young Men Face Higher Risk for Rare Flu Complication

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young men recovering from the flu should be aware of a side effect that causes nerve damage, a health expert warns.

To combat the flu virus, your immune system produces antibodies. In rare cases, these antibodies also attack myelin, which is the protective sheath around the nerves, explained Dr. Sheetal Shroff, a neurologist with Houston Me...

Mosquitoes Spreading Zika Virus in Parts of U.S.: CDC

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Zika infections are on the rise in parts of the United States where mosquitoes spread the virus, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC reported 5,168 cases of Zika-related illness in 2016.

Of those cases in 50 states and Washington, D.C., more than 90 percent were in people who had visited Zika-r...

Best Way to Fight Off Norovirus: Wash Your Hands

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Washing your hands often and thoroughly is the best way to protect yourself if you're caught in a norovirus outbreak, researchers say.

Norovirus is a stomach bug that causes vomiting and diarrhea. Outbreaks can crop up anywhere and anytime. However, they often occur in densely populated spots with large common areas -- cruise ships, vacation...

Why the Flu Makes You Feel So Miserable

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're unlucky enough to come down with the flu, you can blame your own body for your fever, cough, muscle aches and head-to-toe distress, experts say.

Most of influenza's misery is caused by the human body itself, or more precisely the immune system's response to the virus.

"Many of the things that feel bad are the body's attemp...

Who Gets Unneeded Antibiotics Most Often?

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients are more likely than others to get antibiotics they don't need, new research shows.

White adults and children, along with those who had private insurance and lived in urban areas, were more likely to receive a prescription for an antibiotic for common conditions caused by viruses, the researchers said.

Antibiotics only...

More Norovirus Infections at Olympics in South Korea

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- With the Winter Olympics set to start Friday, South Korean officials are scrambling to find the source of a nasty stomach infection called norovirus that has sickened 128 people so far.

South Korean health officials said Thursday that the new cases included members of the Pyeongchang Olympics Organizing Committee, as well as on-site personnel...

Are Germs Falling From the Sky?

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As if you weren't worried enough about the germs on surfaces around you, new research suggests that viruses and bacteria are literally dropping down on your head.

Scientists report that large numbers of all manner of germs circulate in, and fall from, the Earth's atmosphere. Not only that, the virus that lands on you may have traveled from an...

It's a Century Since the 1918 Flu Pandemic - Could It Happen Again?

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- One hundred years ago, the deadliest influenza pandemic of all time made a ravaging march across the globe.

The "Spanish" flu of 1918-19 infected an estimated one-third of the world's population and killed between 50 million and 100 million people, modern epidemiologists estimate.

That raises the inevitable question as the United S...

Got a Pet Rat? Watch Out for This Scary New Virus

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your pet rat could make you very sick by transmitting a virus that's newly emerged in North America, U.S. health officials warn.

Seoul virus is a rat-borne hantavirus that typically causes symptoms that resemble the flu -- fever, headache, muscle pain. In rare cases infection can lead to hospitalization with hemorrhagic fever and kidney failure...

Weak Vaccine Making Flu Season Even Tougher, CDC Says

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- This flu season continues to be one of the nastiest in years. And it isn't helping that the flu vaccine may be less than 20 percent effective against the season's dominant strain, according to a new Canadian report.

In the meantime, thousands of Americans are clogging hospital ERs or suffering at home, with new statistics from the U.S. Centers ...

West Nile Virus May Pose Zika-Like Threat to Fetus

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Zika may not be the only virus that can harm a fetus, a new study in mice suggests.

"We found that West Nile virus and Powassan viruses shared with Zika the ability to infect the placenta and cause fetal death," said senior researcher Dr. Jonathan Miner, who's with Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Both of th...

A New Way to Thwart Disease-Spreading Mosquitoes

MONDAY, Jan. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It sounds like science fiction, but researchers say they have taken the first step toward creating female mosquitoes that don't bite and spread disease.

They identified 902 genes related to blood feeding and 478 genes linked to non-blood feeding from the mosquito species Wyeomyia smithii.

Found in swamps and bogs along the eas...

Zika Attacks Placentas of Pregnant Monkeys, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Jan. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When Zika infection occurs during pregnancy, the virus may damage the placenta, new research finds. This may explain how the infection causes birth defects.

It hasn't been clear how Zika infection can cause birth defects such as microcephaly, a smaller-than-normal head and an underdeveloped brain.

So Dr. Antonio Frias, an obstetricia...

Flu Season One of the Worst in a Decade: CDC

FRIDAY, Jan. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- This flu season is shaping up as one of the nastiest in years, and it isn't showing any signs of easing, U.S. health officials said Friday.

Every state except Hawaii continues to experience widespread activity, with the more virulent H3N2 strain continuing to dominate, according to the latest weekly update from the U.S. Centers for Disease Co...

Zika Tied to Rise in U.S. Birth Defects: CDC

THURSDAY, Jan. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There was a significant rise in Zika-related birth defects in areas of the United States with local transmission of the mosquito-borne virus, a new report shows.

"Babies with Zika-related birth defects need all the help they can get, as soon as possible, and for as long as they need it," said Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald, director of the U.S. Cente...

More Bad News on Flu: It's Tied to Higher Heart Attack Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A bad case of the flu can trigger a short-lived, but substantial, spike in some people's heart attack risk, new research suggests.

Among 332 heart attack patients, the complication was six times more likely to strike following a bout of the flu, researchers reported.

The findings come in the midst of a particularly brutal flu seas...

Severe Flu Cases Just Keep Rising: CDC

FRIDAY, Jan. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An already bad U.S. flu season hasn't peaked yet, with the numbers of related hospitalizations and deaths cotinuing to rise, health officials said Friday.

Influenza - including the virulent H3N2 strain - remains widespread across every state except Hawaii, according to a weekly update released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Preven...

Coming Soon: A Once-Weekly Pill to Fight HIV?

TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Goodbye, daily HIV meds?

Researchers say a once-a-week, slow-release pill may keep HIV infections under control and help prevent new HIV infections altogether.

The pill in question is still early in development. But it contains the same highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) -- the drug combination that revolutionized HIV trea...

Ebola Survivors May Develop Immunity to the Disease

TUESDAY, Dec. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The immune systems of people who survived the first Ebola outbreak 40 years ago appear to be protecting them against future infection with the deadly virus, a new study finds.

The discovery could help in efforts to develop vaccines and drugs to treat Ebola, according to the researchers.

"With the number and frequency of Ebola outbre...

Zika Nerve Damage May Stem From Body's Response to the Virus

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nerve-related complications of Zika infection may be caused by the immune system's response to the virus, not the virus itself, according to a new study.

Zika is spread primarily via the bite of an infected mosquito, but it may also be transmitted by blood transfusion or sexual contact. Most people who become infected don't have any symptoms, ...

Are HIV and AIDS Poised for a Comeback?

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The advent of powerful drugs in the mid-1990s brought remarkable gains in survival for HIV patients who had access to the medications.

But a team of experts now warns that the global HIV pandemic continues and is at risk of expanding, given the worrisome global rise of HIV resistance to antiretroviral (ART) medications.

"Cu...

Can Aspirin Stop Liver Cancer in Hepatitis B Patients?

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Daily aspirin may reduce the risk of liver cancer for people with hepatitis B infection, a new study suggests.

Hepatitis B virus attacks the liver and can cause cirrhosis and liver cancer. Previous research suggests daily low-dose aspirin therapy may prevent cancer, but there is little clinical evidence on whether regular aspirin use can preve...

FDA Approves Test to Screen Donated Blood for Zika

FRIDAY, Oct. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new test -- called the cobas Zika test -- to screen donated blood for the Zika virus.

"Today's action represents the first approval of a Zika virus detection test for use with screening the nation's blood supply," Dr. Peter Marks said Thursday in an agency news release. Marks is director of t...

Zika Vaccine Works in Early Human Trial

THURSDAY, Oct. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental vaccine for the Zika virus has shown signs of success in an early human trial.

The vaccine safely produced Zika-specific antibodies in 100 percent of the people involved in the study.

"Zika virus continues to be a threat to people living in the Americas and the Caribbean," said study author Dr. Pablo Tebas, a profes...

Scientists Learn How Flu Virus Changes So Quickly

TUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have pinpointed a mechanism that helps flu viruses mutate rapidly, which could lead to new ways to fight the flu.

Because flu viruses mutate quickly, flu vaccines have to be redesigned every year.

The MIT researchers found that to mutate rapidly, flu viruses use a group of proteins called chaperones in infected cells in th...

Antibody Injections in Pregnancy Might Shield Fetus From Zika

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new antibody "cocktail" promises to provide effective, if temporary, protection against the Zika virus, a new study reports.

A blend of three potent antibodies completely prevented Zika infection in a group of four lab monkeys, said senior researcher David Watkins, a professor of pathology with the University of Miami Miller School of Medi...

Measles Making a Comeback in the United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 20 years ago, health experts thought it was only a matter of time before measles was completely eradicated in the United States. But over the past 15 years, the disease has gained a new foothold in the United States, likely due to parents choosing not to vaccinate their children, a new study suggests.

From 2001 to 2015 measles cases ...

Don't Let Your Kids Get Sidelined With Sports-Related Infections

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Organized sports provide a wide range of benefits for children and teens. But there's a risk of infections if certain safety measures aren't followed, a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) warns.

"Joining an athletic team is a fun, physically challenging and healthy way for kids to practice teamwork and sportsmanship, bu...

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Wellness Library Results - 8

What is Roseola? Roseola, or roseola infantum, is a fairly mild childhood disease that causes fever and a rash. Sometimes called "baby measles," it typically strikes children between the ages of 6 months and 2 years. It's caused by the human herpes virus 6, a cousin of the viruses that cause cold sores and genital herpes. What are the symptoms? Roseola generally starts with a moderate to hig...

What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)? Although few people have heard of cytomegalovirus, or CMV, many of us are carrying it at this very moment. It's a common virus that's spread during sex, or in blood, urine, saliva, or breast milk; babies can also be infected with it before or during birth. Fifty to 80 percent of American adults have CMV by age 40, but the majority doesn't even know it. The reason is...

What is hantavirus? In 1993, a new medical mystery surfaced in the Four Corners area of the U.S. Southwest. It started when a young Navajo couple died within a few days of each other. Each had seemed perfectly healthy until a sudden illness left them gasping for breath. In each case, death came rapidly. Tests showed that they didn't have bubonic plague or any other known disease. After checking r...

When summer plunges into its hottest months, West Nile virus and the mosquitoes that carry the disease make their unwelcome presence felt in the United States. The virus is believed to have been carried into the country by a traveler from Europe or the Middle East in 1999, but it didn't cause significant problems until summer 2002. By the end of that year, the virus had infected 4,156 people in 3...

What is hepatitis A? The liver is a large, hard-working organ that protects the body from toxins. It can handle all sorts of insults, but it also has its weaknesses. It doesn't like too much alcohol, and it definitely doesn't like viruses that cause hepatitis or inflammation of the liver. There are five types of hepatitis viruses: hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, and F. Of these, A, B, and C are by far ...

What is yellow fever? Yellow fever is a tropical disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is spread by certain types of mosquitoes. There was a time when yellow fever was one of the most feared diseases in America. In the 1700s and 1800s, yellow fever killed more than 100,000 Americans from New Orleans to Boston. The last epidemic in this country ended in 1905, but yellow fever continues to ...

When summer is in full swing, you can bet that people will want to be outdoors. Unfortunately, it's also the time that mosquitoes come out. You should take care to protect yourself from West Nile virus, one of many germs that mosquitoes can carry. The insects pick up the virus by feeding on infected birds and transmit the disease when they bite other animals. The virus has been found in many diffe...

What is rabies? Rabies is one of the oldest diseases known to mankind, and it used to be cause for panic and hysteria. A Spanish neurologist even speculated that rabies may have spurred legends of vampires. Until recently, being bitten by a rabid animal was a death sentence. Even now, we can only prevent the disease, not treat it. Once symptoms appear, rabies is almost always fatal. Thanks to ef...

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