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Health News Results - 142

U.S. Flu Activity Low Right Now, but Rising: CDC

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Flu season is getting off to a slow but steady start, a U.S. health official said Friday.

As of now, only Georgia is seeing high levels of infections, but cases are being reported throughout the nation.

"Flu activity is still fairly low, but as expected we have been seeing activity slowly increasing over the last few weeks," said Ali...

Many Cases of Polio-Like Illness in Kids May Be Misdiagnosed

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's a good chance that some cases of the mysterious polio-like illness seen recently in U.S. children may have been misdiagnosed, a new study reports.

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), which causes potentially life-threatening paralysis and primarily strikes children, has been recurring in the United States in every-other-year waves since 2014...

When Meds Suppress HIV, Odds of Sexual Transmission Near Zero: Review

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When someone with HIV has the virus suppressed with medication, there is virtually no chance of passing it on to sex partners, a new review concludes.

The Public Health Agency of Canada pulled together studies from the last decade looking at the risk of HIV transmission among partners where one person is HIV-positive and one is not.

...

Monkeys Can Carry Zika Virus, Scientists Discover

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Wild monkeys in South America carry the Zika virus, which can then be transmitted to people via mosquitoes, researchers report.

The scientists said the finding suggests it may be impossible to eradicate the virus in the Americas.

"Our findings are important because they change our understanding of the ecology and transmission of Z...

CDC Probe Continues as Cases of Polio-Like Illness Rise in Kids

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Cases of a mysterious polio-like illness continue to mount in the United States, and health officials are scrambling to figure out the cause.

There are now 252 patients under investigation for acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), an increase of 33 patients since last week, said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization ...

Trying to Get the New Shingles Vaccine? Join the Crowd

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For weeks, Donna Greene got the brush-off when she asked the pharmacist about getting her second dose of Shingrix, the sought-after but scarce new shingles vaccine.

Check back next week. Check in two weeks. We just don't know, she was told at last. Finally, in mid-October, Greene got lucky.

"My husband's friend … said he wa...

Getting Flu Shot Annually Won't Undermine Its Effectiveness in Kids

FRIDAY, Oct. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Does getting a flu shot every year diminish its power to protect children?

Absolutely not, say researchers, who found that last year's shot will not in any way reduce the flu-fighting strength of this year's shot.

The conclusion follows three years spent monitoring flu vaccine effectiveness among nearly 3,400 children aged 2 to 17. T...

Flu Activity Is Low -- For Now

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Although this flu season is off to a slow start, U.S. health officials are urging everyone to get vaccinated now.

Why? Last year was one of the worst flu seasons on record, yet fewer Americans got a flu shot than in years past. In fact, less than four in 10 adults were protected against flu and its complications last winter, according to the...

FDA Gives OK to First New Flu Drug in 20 Years

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For the first time in two decades, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new type of antiviral flu drug.

The single oral dose of Xofluza (baloxavir marboxil) is for the treatment of uncomplicated flu in patients aged 12 and older who have had symptoms for no more than 48 hours.

When used within 48 hours of getting s...

Could Herpes Virus Help Cause Alzheimer's?

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- There's growing evidence that the herpes virus responsible for cold sores also may cause Alzheimer's disease, a new research paper contends.

It's been long known that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) can been found in the brains of elderly people with Alzheimer's disease, and research has shown that herpes increases Alzheimer's risk in people gen...

Antiviral Med Fuels Rapid Decline in New HIV Infections in Gay Men: Study

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Giving antiviral medications to gay men without HIV led to a 25 percent reduction in new infections of the AIDS-causing virus, a new study shows.

Researchers followed 3,700 gay men who were given what's known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) under a program in New South Wales, Australia. The regimen generally involves taking a daily pill. ...

CDC Warns of Polio-Like Virus Striking More U.S. Kids

TUESDAY, Oct. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A rare but devastating polio-like virus appears to have made itself at home in the United States, partially paralyzing hundreds of children.

There have been 127 cases reported in 22 states so far this year, with 62 confirmed as acute flaccid myelitis, said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, head of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Dis...

Skip the Cold Meds for Kids Under 6, Experts Say

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- School is in full swing, and with it comes a plethora of colds passed back and forth among kids.

But parents who want to alleviate a sick child's misery would do best to avoid over-the-counter cough and cold remedies.

Decongestants should not be given to children younger than 6 because there's no evidence that they do any good, acc...

Flu Season Lingers in Big Cities

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Big cities with a large commuting workforce tend to have longer, more grinding flu seasons, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that a city's flu season is apt to last longer as its population increases and workplaces become more focused within a few key spots, said lead researcher Benjamin Dalziel, a population biologist with Oregon Stat...

Did Neanderthal DNA Help Early Humans Fend Off Disease?

THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Mating with Neanderthals helped boost modern humans' ability to fight novel viruses in Europe and Asia, a new study contends.

Before vanishing about 40,000 years ago, Neanderthals interbred with modern humans who had migrated out of Africa. As a result, many modern Europeans and Asians have about 2 percent of Neanderthal DNA in their genomes,...

We All Carry a Personal Cloud of Germs, Chemicals

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You might feel squeaky clean after that morning shower, but you carry an invisible cloud of bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemicals every day.

That's one of the lessons from the first study to take a deep dive into the human "exposome" -- the collection of microbes, plant particles and chemicals that accompanies people as they move through t...

New Ebola Virus Found in Bats

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new Ebola virus species discovered in bats in Sierra Leone has never been detected in sick humans or other animals, a new study shows.

It's the first finding of its type, according to the researchers.

The newly identified species -- called Bombali -- has the potential to infect human cells. But it's not known whether it has alread...

Newer HIV Therapies Yield Big Gains But Racial Gaps Persist

TUESDAY, Aug. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Improved treatment has nearly tripled viral suppression rates among HIV patients in the United States over the past two decades, researchers report.

But viral suppression rates remain lower among young people and black Americans, the researchers add.

About 1.2 million U.S. adults have HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Achieving and ...

New Drug of Last Resort Tackles Resistant HIV

THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is typically a manageable infection, but medications that keep the virus at bay don't work for everyone. Now, researchers have developed a new medication to help them.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug -- ibalizumab (Trogarzo) -- in March. Phase 3 trial results were published in the Aug...

Health Woes Hit 1 in 7 Babies Exposed to Zika in U.S. Territories

TUESDAY, Aug. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- About 14 percent of babies born in U.S. territories to women infected with Zika have health problems that may be related to the virus, federal officials reported Tuesday.

The babies either had a Zika-associated birth defect or a neurodevelopmental abnormality possibly caused by Zika infection in the womb, researchers with the Centers for Dise...

AHA: Common Virus Causes Heart Defects in Mice

THURSDAY, Aug. 2, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- A virus that infects millions of Americans every year may on occasion cause heart defects during the early stages of pregnancy, a new study in mice suggests. The findings may give researchers further insights into the causes of congenital heart disease.

The effects of the virus, called coxsackievirus B, may not be identical in hu...

Woman May Have Passed on Ebola a Year After Recovery

TUESDAY, July 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new report suggests that people can survive Ebola and still possibly infect others up to a year later.

The finding could mean that continued monitoring for the disease is still necessary after a country has been declared Ebola-free, the researchers said.

The case study involved a family in Liberia, which had more than 4,800 deaths...

Ebola Antibodies Show Protection Potential in Animal Studies

FRIDAY, July 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Two types of antibodies from the blood of Ebola survivors protected animals against strains of the virus that cause deadly infections in people, researchers report.

It may be possible to use these antibodies to create a treatment for Ebola, the researchers said.

The team, led by Dr. James Crowe of Vanderbilt University Medical Center...

FDA Drops Zika Testing for Blood Donors

FRIDAY, July 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Individual blood donations will no longer need to be tested for the Zika virus, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday.

"When Zika virus first emerged, the unknown course of the epidemic and the observed severe effects from the disease indicated that individual donor testing was needed to ensure the continued safety of the blood supp...

Some California Mosquitoes Can Carry Zika Virus

FRIDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Aedes mosquitoes in California can spread the Zika virus, researchers report.

Laboratory studies have shown that several species of Aedes mosquitoes can transmit Zika, but whether the same species in different regions could spread the virus was unclear. Zika is a relatively mild illness for most people, but it can cause devastati...

Could Herpes Virus Play a Role in Alzheimer's?

THURSDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Viruses could play a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests.

Brains riddled with Alzheimer's disease contain high levels of two strains of human herpes virus, researchers discovered.

Human herpes virus 6 and 7 were found in Alzheimer's-affected brains at levels up to twice as high as in those with...

Florida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne Virus

WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The first confirmed human case of Keystone virus has been diagnosed in a Florida teen, but it's likely that infection with the mosquito-borne disease is common among state residents, researchers report.

The virus can cause a rash and mild fever. It's named after the location in the Tampa Bay area where it was first identified in 1964. It ha...

Who Will and Who Won't Get the Flu?

THURSDAY, June 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors can't yet predict if someone exposed to the flu will become sick. But such predictions may be getting closer to reality, new research hints.

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine say they've identified a "biomarker" that indicates a person's susceptibility to flu viruses.

"We've been after this for about fou...

Humidity Won't Hamper Spread of Flu Virus

THURSDAY, June 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Humidity doesn't hinder the ability of flu viruses to infect people, claims a new study that challenges a long-held belief that the viruses become less active in moist conditions.

The researchers found that mucus and other airway secretions expelled during coughs or sneezes protect flu viruses when they're airborne, regardless of humidity lev...

Human Trials Set for Experimental HIV Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, June 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental HIV vaccine protected animals from dozens of strains of HIV. And a human trial of the vaccine is expected to begin in the second half of 2019, according to U.S. researchers.

The vaccine targets a vulnerable site on HIV -- the virus that causes AIDS -- and triggered antibody production in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys, accordi...

Could New Pig Virus Pose Threat to People?

WEDNESDAY, May 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new virus found in pigs may pose a threat to people, new research suggests.

Researchers found the virus was able to infect cultured human cells and cells of other species in a lab. The discovery is raising concerns about a potentially dangerous outbreak in the United States.

The pig virus, known as Porcine deltacoronavirus, was ...

Scientists Are Targeting the Common Cold

TUESDAY, May 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- British researchers have developed a molecule they claim could make colds a thing of the past.

In lab tests, this molecule blocked viruses that cause colds and prevented them from taking control of human cells.

"The common cold is an inconvenience for most of us, but can cause serious complications in people with conditions like asth...

Opioid Crisis Means More Newborns With Hepatitis C, But Few Get Tested

WEDNESDAY, May 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the U.S. opioid epidemic, hepatitis C is up among pregnant women, raising the risk for mother-to-child transmission of the virus, a new study reveals.

Hepatitis C can be contracted via dirty needles used by opioid addicts.

But just a fraction of newborns exposed to hepatitis C in the womb are screened for the liver-harming in...

Zika May Linger in Semen for Shorter Period Than Thought: Study

WEDNESDAY, April 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Guidelines in place for protecting against the sexual transmission of Zika virus need to be re-evaluated, based on a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC currently recommends that men who have traveled to a Zika-active region either use condoms or abstain from sex for at least 6 months.

But ...

Too Few Baby Boomers Get Hepatitis C Screening

THURSDAY, March 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recommendations, only about one in 10 U.S. baby boomers has been screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV), a new study reveals.

Hepatitis C is a contagious virus that causes nearly half of the cases of liver cancer in the United States. Health officials estimate that about one in 30 Americans born between 1945 and 1965 (the baby boom g...

Detecting Ebola Before Symptoms Show Up

WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An immune system response may reveal presence of the deadly Ebola virus before symptoms appear, researchers report.

Currently, there's no way to diagnose Ebola until symptoms show up, which can occur anytime between 2 and 21 days after exposure to the virus, the researchers explained. But by the time symptoms appear, the disease is already...

When Is a Sick Fellow Flier a Health Risk to You?

MONDAY, March 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you worry about catching a nasty infection when you fly, a new study suggests your risk boils down to exactly how close you are to that sick passenger.

A row in front, a row in back, a couple of seats to the side, and your chances of getting sick jump, researchers report.

"Passengers should not, however, worry about getting sick ...

Young Men Face Higher Risk for Rare Flu Complication

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Young men recovering from the flu should be aware of a side effect that causes nerve damage, a health expert warns.

To combat the flu virus, your immune system produces antibodies. In rare cases, these antibodies also attack myelin, which is the protective sheath around the nerves, explained Dr. Sheetal Shroff, a neurologist with Houston Me...

Mosquitoes Spreading Zika Virus in Parts of U.S.: CDC

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Zika infections are on the rise in parts of the United States where mosquitoes spread the virus, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC reported 5,168 cases of Zika-related illness in 2016.

Of those cases in 50 states and Washington, D.C., more than 90 percent were in people who had visited Zika-r...

Best Way to Fight Off Norovirus: Wash Your Hands

THURSDAY, March 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Washing your hands often and thoroughly is the best way to protect yourself if you're caught in a norovirus outbreak, researchers say.

Norovirus is a stomach bug that causes vomiting and diarrhea. Outbreaks can crop up anywhere and anytime. However, they often occur in densely populated spots with large common areas -- cruise ships, vacation...

Why the Flu Makes You Feel So Miserable

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're unlucky enough to come down with the flu, you can blame your own body for your fever, cough, muscle aches and head-to-toe distress, experts say.

Most of influenza's misery is caused by the human body itself, or more precisely the immune system's response to the virus.

"Many of the things that feel bad are the body's attemp...

Who Gets Unneeded Antibiotics Most Often?

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients are more likely than others to get antibiotics they don't need, new research shows.

White adults and children, along with those who had private insurance and lived in urban areas, were more likely to receive a prescription for an antibiotic for common conditions caused by viruses, the researchers said.

Antibiotics only...

More Norovirus Infections at Olympics in South Korea

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- With the Winter Olympics set to start Friday, South Korean officials are scrambling to find the source of a nasty stomach infection called norovirus that has sickened 128 people so far.

South Korean health officials said Thursday that the new cases included members of the Pyeongchang Olympics Organizing Committee, as well as on-site personnel...

Are Germs Falling From the Sky?

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As if you weren't worried enough about the germs on surfaces around you, new research suggests that viruses and bacteria are literally dropping down on your head.

Scientists report that large numbers of all manner of germs circulate in, and fall from, the Earth's atmosphere. Not only that, the virus that lands on you may have traveled from an...

It's a Century Since the 1918 Flu Pandemic - Could It Happen Again?

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- One hundred years ago, the deadliest influenza pandemic of all time made a ravaging march across the globe.

The "Spanish" flu of 1918-19 infected an estimated one-third of the world's population and killed between 50 million and 100 million people, modern epidemiologists estimate.

That raises the inevitable question as the United S...

Got a Pet Rat? Watch Out for This Scary New Virus

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Your pet rat could make you very sick by transmitting a virus that's newly emerged in North America, U.S. health officials warn.

Seoul virus is a rat-borne hantavirus that typically causes symptoms that resemble the flu -- fever, headache, muscle pain. In rare cases infection can lead to hospitalization with hemorrhagic fever and kidney failure...

Weak Vaccine Making Flu Season Even Tougher, CDC Says

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- This flu season continues to be one of the nastiest in years. And it isn't helping that the flu vaccine may be less than 20 percent effective against the season's dominant strain, according to a new Canadian report.

In the meantime, thousands of Americans are clogging hospital ERs or suffering at home, with new statistics from the U.S. Centers ...

West Nile Virus May Pose Zika-Like Threat to Fetus

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Zika may not be the only virus that can harm a fetus, a new study in mice suggests.

"We found that West Nile virus and Powassan viruses shared with Zika the ability to infect the placenta and cause fetal death," said senior researcher Dr. Jonathan Miner, who's with Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Both of th...

A New Way to Thwart Disease-Spreading Mosquitoes

MONDAY, Jan. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It sounds like science fiction, but researchers say they have taken the first step toward creating female mosquitoes that don't bite and spread disease.

They identified 902 genes related to blood feeding and 478 genes linked to non-blood feeding from the mosquito species Wyeomyia smithii.

Found in swamps and bogs along the eas...

Zika Attacks Placentas of Pregnant Monkeys, Study Finds

FRIDAY, Jan. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When Zika infection occurs during pregnancy, the virus may damage the placenta, new research finds. This may explain how the infection causes birth defects.

It hasn't been clear how Zika infection can cause birth defects such as microcephaly, a smaller-than-normal head and an underdeveloped brain.

So Dr. Antonio Frias, an obstetricia...

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Wellness Library Results - 8

What is Roseola? Roseola, or roseola infantum, is a fairly mild childhood disease that causes fever and a rash. Sometimes called "baby measles," it typically strikes children between the ages of 6 months and 2 years. It's caused by the human herpes virus 6, a cousin of the viruses that cause cold sores and genital herpes. What are the symptoms? Roseola generally starts with a moderate to hig...

What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)? Although few people have heard of cytomegalovirus, or CMV, many of us are carrying it at this very moment. It's a common virus that's spread during sex, or in blood, urine, saliva, or breast milk; babies can also be infected with it before or during birth. Fifty to 80 percent of American adults have CMV by age 40, but the majority doesn't even know it. The reason is...

What is hantavirus? In 1993, a new medical mystery surfaced in the Four Corners area of the U.S. Southwest. It started when a young Navajo couple died within a few days of each other. Each had seemed perfectly healthy until a sudden illness left them gasping for breath. In each case, death came rapidly. Tests showed that they didn't have bubonic plague or any other known disease. After checking r...

When summer plunges into its hottest months, West Nile virus and the mosquitoes that carry the disease make their unwelcome presence felt in the United States. The virus is believed to have been carried into the country by a traveler from Europe or the Middle East in 1999, but it didn't cause significant problems until summer 2002. By the end of that year, the virus had infected 4,156 people in 3...

What is hepatitis A? The liver is a large, hard-working organ that protects the body from toxins. It can handle all sorts of insults, but it also has its weaknesses. It doesn't like too much alcohol, and it definitely doesn't like viruses that cause hepatitis or inflammation of the liver. There are five types of hepatitis viruses: hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, and F. Of these, A, B, and C are by far ...

What is yellow fever? Yellow fever is a tropical disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is spread by certain types of mosquitoes. There was a time when yellow fever was one of the most feared diseases in America. In the 1700s and 1800s, yellow fever killed more than 100,000 Americans from New Orleans to Boston. The last epidemic in this country ended in 1905, but yellow fever continues to ...

When summer is in full swing, you can bet that people will want to be outdoors. Unfortunately, it's also the time that mosquitoes come out. You should take care to protect yourself from West Nile virus, one of many germs that mosquitoes can carry. The insects pick up the virus by feeding on infected birds and transmit the disease when they bite other animals. The virus has been found in many diffe...

What is rabies? Rabies is one of the oldest diseases known to mankind, and it used to be cause for panic and hysteria. A Spanish neurologist even speculated that rabies may have spurred legends of vampires. Until recently, being bitten by a rabid animal was a death sentence. Even now, we can only prevent the disease, not treat it. Once symptoms appear, rabies is almost always fatal. Thanks to ef...

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