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Results for search "Obesity".

19 Dec

Obesity and Dementia

Obesity in middle-age ups the risk of dementia, but poor diet may not.

11 Dec

Does Obesity In Childhood Hurt Brain Development?

Obesity in adolescence is linked to brain changes and deficits in working memory.

24 Apr

How Obesity Changes the Brain

The amount of body fat you carry can change your brain structure.

Health News Results - 280

FDA Requests Market Withdrawal of Diet Drug Belviq Due to Cancer Risk

A clinical trial of the weight-loss drug Belviq (lorcaserin) shows an association with an increased risk of cancer, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is requesting that its maker withdraw the drug from the U.S. market.

Eisai Inc. has already "submitted a request to voluntarily withdraw the drug," Dr. Janet Woodcock, who directs the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research...

Mom-to-Be's Cosmetics Chemicals Could Lead to Heavier Baby

When pregnant women use cosmetics containing parabens, their children may have a greater likelihood of becoming overweight, a new study suggests.

Parabens are chemicals that have long been used as a preservative in cosmetics and body care products. A number of studies have suggested that parabens mimic estrogens in the body and may disrupt the normal function of hormones.

In...

For Teens, Weight-Loss Surgery May Not Bring Emotional Gains

Following weight-loss surgery, teens may see some aspects of their health improve, but overall mental health isn't likely to budge, a new study suggests.

In the five years after gastric bypass surgery, teens experienced small gains in self-esteem and some improvement in binge-eating, but no sizable boost in overall mood, researchers found.

"The transition from adolescence ...

Are Antibiotics a Recipe for Obesity in Childhood?

Children who receive multiple antibiotic prescriptions early in life may be vulnerable to obesity, two new studies suggest.

In one study, researchers found that 4-year-olds who'd received more than nine antibiotic prescriptions in their lives were twice as likely to be obese as their peers with no antibiotic exposure.

The second study found a similar pattern. However, the an...

Super-Cooled Injections Might Ice Away 'Deep Fat'

The Harvard-associated lab that created the "CoolSculpting" process of reducing fat says it's on the trail of the next advance in nonsurgical slimming.

CoolSculpting freezes fat cells by applying an ice-cold gel pad to the skin, causing cells to die off and either be flushed away or absorbed by the body, said lead researcher Dr. Lilit Garibyan, an investigator at the Wellman Center for ...

Don't Want a 2nd Heart Attack? Lose the Belly Fat

For heart attack survivors, a fat belly could mean another one is likely, a new study suggests.

Earlier studies have shown that abdominal obesity puts people at risk for their first heart attack. This new study shows it also ups the odds for a second one, researchers say.

"Abdominal obesity not only increases your risk for a first heart attack or stroke, but also the risk ...

Which Obesity Surgery Is Right for You?

People considering obesity surgery have a lot to think about, including the specific procedure they want. Now a large study finds that one surgery is tied to a higher rates of hospitalization in the years afterward.

Looking at medical records from more than 33,000 U.S. patients, researchers found that those who underwent gastric bypass surgery had higher rates of hospitalization in th...

Cluster of Unhealthy Risk Factors Could Raise Odds of Recurrent Blood Clots

People with what's known as the "metabolic syndrome" are vulnerable to recurring blood clots, new research shows.

Metabolic syndrome is a collection of conditions, including obesity, high blood sugar, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. These factors put people at risk for diabetes, heart disease and a type of blood clot known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), researchers say.

...

Processed Foods Are Making Americans Obese

The convenience and lower cost of processed foods is hard to resist. But ready-to-eat meals and snacks are making Americans obese and unhealthy, a new study suggests.

As more people eat cheaper processed foods, they are getting fatter, said researcher Leigh Frame, from George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, in Washington, D.C.

Frame and a colleague anal...

Want a Long, Healthy Old Age? A Healthy Middle Age Helps

Middle-aged Americans who are exercising and eating right, give yourselves a pat on the back: Your efforts will pay off, new research shows.

A study involving more than 110,000 people finds that a healthy lifestyle in middle age appeared to help folks live longer lives free of major diseases.

Researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health said that many prior s...

What Matters More for Obesity Risk, Genes or Lifestyle?

A new study suggests that genetics is not destiny when it comes to your odds of becoming obese.

For years, research into "obesity genes" has led many Americans to believe that their DNA makes becoming overweight and obese inevitable.

But the new study shows that daily lifestyle -- not genes -- probably plays the much bigger role.

The study tracked data on more tha...

Calories Per Serving or the Whole Package? Many Food Labels Now Tell Both

For decades, consumers have often been puzzled by what a "serving" means on Nutrition Facts labels on foods.

Well, things might have just gotten a bit clearer. New labeling regulations went into effect in January, and on many products you'll now see the total amount of calories (and various nutrients) per serving, as well as for the whole package.

"With the introduction of t...

Victoria's Secret Models Are Skinnier Now, as Average Woman's Waistline Widens

For the average American woman, it's now tougher than ever before to match the "ideal" beauty set by supermodels, new research shows.

Even as the average dress size for a U.S. woman rises, the measurements of the average Victoria's Secret model have shrunk, according to researchers at Boston University School of Medicine.

For the study, the researchers tracked the measuremen...

Obesity May Boost Effectiveness of a Lung Cancer Therapy

Obesity is seldom a friend to health, but in one medical context it might give patients a slight advantage, new research suggests.

Specifically, when Australian researchers looked at trials of atezolizumab, an immune system-based treatment for lung cancer, they found that the drug worked better in people who were overweight.

The trial involved more than 2,100 people with th...

Americans Need to Tackle Youth Obesity: U.S. Task Force

Childhood obesity is such a crisis in America that officials have been updating recommendations for how early intervention should begin.

Obesity now affects as many as 20% of the nation's children.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force reviewed the literature on kids between 2 and 18 years of age and now recommends that kids over 6 be screened using a measure of body ...

How You Can Be Overfat Without Being Overweight

You know that you need to watch your weight to lower your risk for heart disease, but that is far from the whole story.

It is possible to be overfat without being overweight, meaning that you're storing fat within your body even though the scale says you're at a normal weight. And that distinction is key when it comes to heart health.

For decades, doctors have measured a pa...

Getting Active Helps Kids' Hearts, Even in the Obese

Regular exercise reduces heart risk factors in overweight and obese kids, researchers report.

Their study included 175 inactive boys and girls, aged 8 to 11, who took part in afterschool programs.

All of them did homework for about a half-hour and had a healthy snack. Some were randomly selected to do instructor-led physical activity such as jumping rope and playing tag for ...

Obesity Might Skew Blood Tests in Kids

If your child is obese, new research suggests that those extra pounds can alter the results of routine blood tests.

"We performed the first comprehensive analysis of the effect of obesity on routine blood tests in a large community population of children and found that almost 70% of the blood tests studied were affected," said study first author Victoria Higgins, from the Hospital...

Growing Obesity Rates May Contribute to Climate Change

Rising obesity rates worldwide may be contributing to the climate crisis, researchers report.

"Our analysis suggests that, in addition to beneficial effects on morbidity, mortality and health care costs, managing obesity can favorably affect the environment as well," said study corresponding author Faidon Magkos, from the department of nutrition, exercise and sports at the University ...

Obesity in Middle Age Could Raise Odds for Alzheimer's Later

Obesity in middle age is associated with an increased risk of dementia later in life, according to a study of more than 1 million women in the United Kingdom.

Those who were obese in their mid-50s had 21% greater risk of being diagnosed with dementia 15 or more years later, compared with women who had a healthy weight, a team of British and international researchers found.

T...

Half of U.S. Adults Will Be Obese in 10 Years

A decade from now, roughly half of U.S. adults will be obese -- with nearly one-quarter severely so, a new study projects.

The predictions by researchers at Harvard University paint a grim picture: By 2030, the prevalence of adult obesity will be at least 35% in every U.S. state, and in 29 states, the figure will top 50%.

Particularly troubling is the expected rise i...

Could Obesity Alter a Child's Brain Structure?

Childhood obesity may be linked to changes in brain structure that might result in impulsive kids who struggle with problem-solving, a new study reports.

Overweight and obese children tend to have a thinner prefrontal cortex, a part of the brain associated with decision-making and problem-solving. These same kids performed more poorly on games designed to evaluate those skills, said l...

Low-Dose Aspirin Might Cut Cancer Risk, Especially for Overweight People

Daily low-dose aspirin might reduce your risk of dying from cancer, particularly if you've packed on a few extra pounds, researchers say.

Taking aspirin three or more times a week is associated with a lower risk of cancer death as well as death for any reason, a new study reports.

Aspirin's protective effect appears particularly pronounced among people who are overweight -- ...

Hibernating Animals Give Clues to Obesity in Humans

A look at the genetics of hibernating animals might shed light on obesity in humans.

"Hibernators have evolved an incredible ability to control their metabolism," explained Christopher Gregg, an associate professor in the Department of Neurology and Anatomy at the University of Utah.

"Metabolism shapes risks for a lot of different diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes...

Obesity May Change the Teen Brain, MRI Study Shows

Obese teenagers can have certain brain differences from their thinner peers -- changes that might signal damage from inflammation, a new, preliminary study suggests.

Using advanced MRI techniques, researchers found that obese teenagers tended to have signs of decreased "integrity" in the brain's white matter. White matter contains the fibers that connect different areas of the brain.<...

4 in 5 Adolescents Worldwide Don't Exercise Enough

Four of five older children and teens around the world don't get the recommended amount of physical activity, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data gathered between 2001 and 2016 from 1.6 million students, aged 11 to 17, in 146 countries. They found that 81% of them did not meet World Health Organization recommendations for an hour of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity e...

More U.S. Kids Are Shunning Sweetened Drinks

American youngsters are drinking far fewer sodas and other sugar-sweetened drinks and getting far fewer calories from them than they used to, a new report finds.

But kids from more-affluent homes are benefiting more from these trends than those from poorer families, the researchers said.

For example, the percentage of kids from more-affluent homes who drank at least one swee...

More Americans Trying to Lose Weight, But Few Succeeding

Americans are more motivated to lose weight than ever before, with increasing numbers eating less, exercising, drinking water and trying out new diets.

And it's all for naught.

Folks are heavier than ever despite all this effort, reports a new study.

The proportion of people who've tried to lose weight during the previous year increased to 42% in 2015-2016, up...

Most Americans Fear Cancer, but Feel Powerless to Prevent It: Survey

While 6 in 10 Americans say they're concerned about developing cancer, only 1 in 4 make cancer prevention part of their daily lives, a new online survey reveals.

Roughly a quarter think there's nothing they can do to prevent it. But the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) says as many of half of cancer cases are preventable.

"Tobacco use, diet, sun exposure, alcohol...

Too Little Time to Exercise? Survey Suggests Otherwise

"I'd love to exercise more, but I just can't find the time."

It's a common refrain from many Americans but, for most, it might also be untrue, a new survey finds.

Researchers at the nonprofit RAND Corporation polled more than 32,000 Americans over the age of 14.

The survey found that, generally, people have an average of more than five hours of leisure time per day...

Ban on Sale of Sugary Drinks Trimmed Employees' Waistlines

After the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of sugary drinks, employees started downing less liquid sugar -- and their waistlines showed it.

In a before-and-after study, researchers found that the ban, begun in 2015, cut employees' intake of sugary drinks by almost 50%. And within 10 months, their collective waist size had shrunk by almost an inch.

Th...

Fast-Food Outlet in Neighborhood Could Mean Heavier Kids: Study

Having a fast-food joint right down the block might not bode well for your child's chances of staying a healthy weight, new research suggests.

Among the more than 1 million children who attend New York City public schools, the closer kids lived to places that sell unhealthy food, the greater their risk was for packing on the pounds, the study found.

Researchers analyzed data...

Pediatricians' Group Calls for More Research on Artificial Sweeteners

There are many unanswered questions about the long-term safety and impacts of artificial sweeteners in children, a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement says.

The AAP statement also recommends that the amount of artificial sweeteners should be listed on product labels to help parents and researchers better understand how much children are consuming, and the possib...

Experts Support Weight-Loss Surgery for Very Obese Kids

Weight-loss surgery should be more widely used to treat severely obese children and teens, a leading pediatricians' group says.

Severe obesity is a serious and worsening public health crisis among U.S. youngsters, and weight-loss surgery is one of the few effective ways of treating it, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in its new policy ...

Fat Collects in Lungs, Raising Asthma Risk

Excess weight is hard on the heart, but new research shows it may also harm your lungs.

The study found that higher amounts of fat collect in the airways of overweight and obese people, which may help explain why they're more likely to have wheezing and asthma.

In the study, the investigators analyzed lung samples donated by 52 people for research after their death. Of those...

Why Maintaining a Healthy Weight Is Important in Adulthood

Adults who pack on pounds between their mid-20s and middle age have an increased risk of premature death -- and the same is true of those who lose weight from middle to late adulthood, according to a new study.

The findings suggest that maintaining normal weight throughout adulthood reduces the risk of early death, the China-based researchers said.

They analyzed data from mo...

Aging Population, Unhealthy Habits Underlie Expected Cancer Surge

Due to population growth and aging, the number of cancer cases worldwide is expected to jump 60% by 2040 -- but unhealthy lifestyle habits are likely to make the surge even larger.

That's the conclusion from the new edition of the Cancer Atlas, unveiled Wednesday at the World Cancer Leaders' Summit in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan. It notes that unhealthy habits such as smoking, p...

Childhood Risk Factors Can Predict Adult Obesity

Certain risk factors in childhood can identify those who are more likely to suffer severe obesity in adulthood, a new study finds.

The research included more than 12,000 participants from different countries who were followed from childhood in the 1970s and 1980s into adulthood.

In childhood, 82% of the participants had normal weight, 11% were overweight, 5% were...

Nearly 5 Million American Kids Are Obese, New Study Finds

America's child obesity epidemic shows no signs of shrinking.

About 4.8 million American kids aged 10 to 17 -- just over 15% -- were obese in 2017-2018, according to a new report.

"These new data show that this challenge touches the lives of far too many children in this country," said Dr. Richard Besser, the president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which...

Pressuring Kids to Diet Can Backfire, Damaging Long-Term Health

Parents want the best for their children. Eat well. Get enough sleep. Exercise. But sometimes pressuring your teen to diet or lose weight may end up harming them, a new study suggests.

It found that parents who urge their kids to diet might actually be boosting their odds for obesity later in life. It's also tied to an increased risk for eating disorders.

The phenomenon can ...

High Lead Levels in Pregnancy Linked to Obesity in Kids Years Later

Children whose moms had high levels of lead in their blood during pregnancy are more likely than others to carry excess weight by age 8, new research reveals.

The conclusion stems from a look at blood tests of more than 1,440 mothers within three days after delivery. Their lead levels were then compared to their offspring's weight fluctuations during childhood.

The study cou...

Despite Rise in New Cases, Breast Cancer Deaths Continue to Fall

Deaths from breast cancer are still declining in the United States, even as more women are being diagnosed with the disease, a new report shows.

Researchers from the American Cancer Society found that the national decline in breast cancer deaths, which began about 30 years ago, is still evident. Between 1989 and 2017, the overall death rate dropped 40%.

The pace of that ...

Overweight Dog, Overweight Owner?

Most dogs and owners share an unbreakable emotional bond. But can they also share expanding waistlines?

Yes, said Danish researchers, who found that Fido is twice as likely to be heavy or obese if his owner is as well.

Why? "Based on our findings, it seems that the way owners give their dog treats is related to the owner's weight," explained study author Dr. Charlotte Bjornv...

It Takes Less Weight to Trigger Diabetes in Minorities Than Whites

One of the biggest risk factors for type 2 diabetes is excess weight. But you don't have to be overweight to have the disease -- and new research revealed that some racial and ethnic minority groups are more likely to have diabetes at lower weights.

"Patients who belong to one of the high-prevalence racial or ethnic groups may be at risk for diabetes or prediabetes even if the...

Scientists Discover New Way Fat Harms Your Arteries

Scientists may have found a way that obesity directly damages the arteries and contributes to heart disease -- a discovery that they say could eventually lead to new treatments.

The British researchers found that in heart disease patients who are obese, body fat surrounding the arteries tends to secrete high amounts of a protein called WNT5A. The protein, in turn, appears to have "tox...

Can You Still Be Healthy If You're Overweight?

If you're overweight but have dodged chronic health issues like high cholesterol and high blood pressure, you might not think that losing weight is a priority. But an analysis of five years of records on 3.5 million people -- underweight, normal weight, overweight and obese -- has found reason for concern.

The researchers discovered that even if people didn't have any metabolic diseas...

New Healthy Drinks Guidelines for Kids: Skip the Soy, Avoid Sugars

Four of America's biggest health organizations are banding together to urge parents to better monitor the drinks their young kids sip each day.

The take-home message from the new "Healthy Drinks, Healthy Kids" guidelines: Cut down on sugary sodas, juices and the like, and favor breast milk or cow's milk for youngsters instead of trendy plant-based milks.

"As a pediatrician,...

Later Bedtimes Could Mean Wider Waistlines for Teen Girls

Teenaged girls who stay up late every night could pay a price in added pounds, new research shows.

There could even be greater ramifications for girls' health, with risks for "cardiometabolic" issues -- such as heart disease and diabetes -- rising with later bedtimes, the researchers said.

A similar trend was not shown for boys, although the research team stressed that t...

Is Your State One of the 'Most Obese' in America?

The number of U.S. states with adult obesity rates above 35% reached an all-time high of nine in 2018, a new report says.

In 2018, the nine states with adult obesity rates above 35% were: Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and West Virginia.

That's two more than the year before. As recently as 2012, no state topped 35...

How Your Genes Affect the Number on Your Scale

Could your genes be keeping you from losing weight?

While you shouldn't use a family tendency toward wide hips or an apple shape as an excuse to stray from a healthy diet, acceptance can help you reassess your personal ideal and make you happier with your body.

Hundreds of genes have been linked to weight. Some affect where fat is distributed on your body while others impac...

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