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08 Nov

The Impact of Family Criticism On Your Health

Strained relations with your parents and siblings may hurt your health more than problems with your spouse or partner.

Health News Results - 88

Family Members Are Swiping Hospice Patients' Painkillers: Study

In another sign of just how bad the U.S. opioid abuse epidemic has become, a new study finds family members often steal painkillers from dying relatives in hospice care.

In a survey of 371 hospices, 31% reported at least one case in which drugs were taken from a patient in the past 90 days. The thieves were most often relatives.

Lead researcher John Cagle said it's not c...

Many Gun Owners Leave Weapons Unlocked at Home

Four in 10 gun owners have at least one gun at home that isn't locked up, even if there are children in the home, a new survey suggests.

To come to that conclusion, researchers questioned nearly 3,000 people while they waited for a free gun storage device (lockbox or trigger lock) at public gun safety events in 10 cities in Washington state between 2015 and 2018.

While many ...

Family Therapy Best for Youth at Risk for Bipolar Disorder

Therapy for the entire family might help kids and teens vulnerable to bipolar disorder stay healthy longer, new research suggests.

Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, the University of Colorado and Stanford University studied 127 young people from ages 9 to 17.

They analyzed two types of treatment that delay new and recurring bipolar symptoms: family-...

Family's Social Standing May Be Key to Happiness for Teens

How teens see their family's social status may play a part in their mental health and success at school, a new study suggests.

Social status appears to be more important than what their parents do for a living, how much money they have or how educated they are, the researchers said.

"The amount of financial resources children have access to is one of the most reliable pred...

Caring for Grandkids Might Help Stave Off Loneliness

Caring for a grandchild might be the best way to fight the isolation of old age, new research suggests.

This conclusion is based on 2014 data collected as part of an ongoing German survey of older adults.

Among the nearly 3,900 grandparents in the survey, more than 1,100 said they cared for a grandchild. Those who had grandchildren to care for had lower scores on loneliness...

Many Moms-to-Be Turn to Their Moms First for Medical Advice

Moms trump doctors when it comes to pregnancy advice, a new study suggests.

More often than not, pregnant women rely on guidance from their mothers instead of medical experts, the researchers found.

Many believe their mom's advice is as good or even better than medical recommendations.

"And often for good reason," said study author Danielle Bessett, an associate ...

Caring for Family Matters Most to People Around the Globe

It may come as no surprise to some, but new research shows that taking care of family and keeping a mate are the most important things for folks worldwide.

Researchers surveyed more than 7,000 people in 27 countries about what motivates them. The study included people from a wide range of countries -- Australia and Bulgaria to Thailand and Uganda -- on all continents except Antarctica...

Where 'Superbugs' Lurk in Your Home - and How to Stop Them

Researchers have learned more about how a "superbug" infection can infiltrate your home -- and they have some suggestions for protecting your family.

Armed with swabs, investigators made several trips to homes where a child had come down with an infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA.

They found that the ba...

Don't Get Along With Family? Check Your Health

There's a new reason to keep the peace this holiday season: Strained relationships with family may be worse for your health than trouble with a spouse or significant other, new research suggests.

Parents, siblings and extended family members appear to affect your well-being, even into middle age and beyond, the study found.

"Family relationships matter for health," said le...

Family Can Help Keep Delirium at Bay After Surgery

Many older hospital patients suffer delirium after surgery, but a new program that involves the patient's family in recovery may help, a new study suggests.

Called the Tailored, Family-Involved Hospital Elder Life Program (t-HELP), it appears to help lessen the burden of postoperative delirium while maintaining or improving physical and thinking functions, and shortening the time pat...

'Self-Silencing' Can Be Potentially Deadly for Women

Do you rarely express anger at those close to you? Is it difficult for you to reveal negative feelings in your relationships?

New research suggests that might make you more vulnerable to having a stroke.

In a study of women aged 40 to 60, those who suffered from "self-silencing" had an increased risk of having plaque in their carotid arteries.

Repressing one's fee...

A Good Reason to Stop Squabbling at Home

Few families are able to escape squabbles completely, whether between spouses, children or other relatives.

But a Danish study that looked at nearly 10,000 men and women, aged 36 to 52, warns that stressful social relations can be more than just unpleasant -- they can increase your overall risk of early death.

How can you live in better harmony? Though your approach might d...

Nurturing Childhood Boosts Odds of a Happy Adult Life: Study

Kids who grow up confident that their parents, friends and community have their back are far less likely to struggle with depression or other serious mental health issues as adults, new research indicates.

The survey of nearly 6,200 adults also found that bad experiences, such as emotional or physical abuse, don't inevitably doom kids to a difficult adulthood. When children who have e...

AHA News: Time With Grandkids Could Boost Health - Even Lifespan

Julie Brogan's granddaughters, ages 9, 12 and 13, spend part of every summer at her home overlooking Lake Michigan in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. They enjoy paddle boarding, swimming and working on projects in the professional painter's art studio.

Their experiences have mirrored what scientific researchers have found: Spending time with grandchildren can have positive health impacts. B...

New Study Finds a Family Risk for Blood Cancer

If a close relative has had blood cancer, you're more likely to get it, a large new study reports.

The researchers analyzed data from 16 million people in Sweden, including more than 153,000 diagnosed with blood cancer and more than 391,000 of their first-degree relatives: parents, siblings or children.

Patients with a family link accounted for 4.1% of all blood cancer ...

Opioid Epidemic Doubled Number of U.S. Kids Sent to Foster Care

The opioid epidemic appears to be literally tearing families apart.

Children are being taken out of their homes at alarming rates because their parents are abusing drugs, a new study shows.

The number of kids placed in foster care in the United States due to parental drug use has more than doubled over the past two decades, rising to nearly 96,700 in 2017 from about 39,100 i...

Ageism Disappears When Young and Old Spend Time Together

Ageism is pervasive throughout society, and harmful to young and old alike. But a new study finds some simple steps can help erase it.

Mixing younger and older people in various settings, combined with educating younger people about the aging process and its misconceptions, works quickly to reduce ageism, the new research indicates.

"The findings really suggest that these in...

White House Immigration Proposal May Harm Health of 1.9 Million Kids

Almost 2 million children could lose out on vital public health care and food assistance due to a proposed Trump administration rule change related to U.S. immigration, a new study argues.

As many as 1.9 million children with specific medical problems are projected to drop out of federal health and nutrition benefit programs if the administration follows through on a plan to broaden t...

Connected Teens Become Healthier Adults

Teens who feel connected with others at home and school have fewer serious health problems and risks as young adults, a new study suggests.

Young adults who had higher levels of connectedness -- feeling engaged, supported and cared for at home and at school -- when they were teens were as much as 66% less likely to have mental health problems, to experience violence, to take sexua...

Many Lesbian, Gay Teens Still Face Rejection by Parents

Many parents of lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) children take years to adjust after learning about their sexual orientation, a new study finds.

The study included more than 1,200 parents of LGB youth aged 10 to 25. The parents visited a website with LGB resources and were asked to complete a questionnaire.

Of those parents, 26% had learned that their child identified as L...

'Dad Shaming' Is Real, Survey Shows

It's not just Moms: Just ahead of Father's Day, a new survey finds that about half of American dads say they've been criticized about their parenting styles.

The way they enforced discipline topped the list of things naysayers called them to task on, with two-thirds of critiques focused on that subject.

Forty-four percent of the time, the criticism came from a family member...

When Fido Comes Along on Your Vacation

Summertime is vacation time, and plenty of people bring their pets along on their adventure, so one expert offers tips on how to make the trip fun for all.

"Before attempting a car ride, acclimate your pet to the harness or crate," said Kit Darling, infection control coordinator at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences.

Start by giving yo...

How to Put Limits on Your Family's Screen Time

While kids get some benefit from using digital and social media, such as early learning and exposure to new ideas, too much of it can negatively affect their health, sleep and eating habits, and even their attention span.

But ruling out all media usage isn't the answer either.

An approach suggested by the American Academy of Pediatrics can help you strike the right balance. ...

Team Sports Could Help Traumatized Kids Grow Into Healthy Adults

Coming from a broken home or suffering abuse can traumatize a child, but new research suggests team sports might be just the medicine these kids need.

Tracking U.S. health data from nearly 10,000 people, researchers found that teens who experienced childhood trauma and played team sports had lower odds of depression and anxiety as young adults.

"As a pediatrician going thro...

For People With Heart Failure, Loneliness Can Mean Worse Care

Fewer than 1 in 10 heart failure patients follow lifestyle treatment recommendations, and a new study suggests that loneliness is a major reason why.

Polish researchers assessed 475 heart failure patients' compliance with a regimen of restricting salt and fluid intake, being physically active, and weighing themselves each day.

Only 7 of the patients followed all four li...

Thriving in a Multi-Generational Home

If you're part of a multi-generational home, you're in good company. The number of Americans living with two or more adult generations of one family rose during the last recession and has grown to an all-time high during the recovery.

More than 64 million Americans live in a multi-generational home, according to a census analysis by the Pew Research Center.

About half of suc...

Many Drug Abusers Use Family Members to 'Opioid Shop'

People who are thwarted in their attempts to "shop around" for prescription opioid painkillers at doctors' offices and pharmacies may try to get the drugs via relatives as a last resort, researchers report.

Some people who misuse opioids go to numerous prescribers and fill prescriptions at multiple pharmacies to avoid detection. But states are cracking down on such "shopping," forcing...

E-Cigarettes Used in 5% of U.S. Homes With Kids

As e-cigarettes gain fans, children may be losing out. New research suggests that vaping parents expose children to secondhand fumes that may be as harmful as tobacco smoke.

Nearly 5% of U.S. adults living with children use e-cigarettes, according to the study. And many of those kids have asthma.

"Although e-cigarette aerosols are commonly perceived to be harmless vapor...

How to Tame Morning Chaos

Are your mornings always chaotic? Between making breakfast, packing lunches, getting everyone dressed and hunting for homework assignments, it's easy to feel like you've put in a day's worth of work before 9 a.m.

The answer is to start the night before, with kids and parents picking out the next day's clothes and filling backpacks and placing them at the door, along with any ex...

Untrained Caregivers Bear Burden of Care for Families: Report

Twenty million largely self-taught home caregivers in the United States perform complex medical tasks for family members and friends, a new report says.

That means that half of the nation's 40 million family caregivers do things typically performed by health care professionals, such as giving injections, preparing special diets, handling tube feedings, and dealing with specialized eq...

Caregiving May Not Be as Taxing to Your Health as Feared

Being a family caregiver may not be as hazardous to your health as most people think, researchers say.

Decades of research papers and media reports have warned that family caregivers are at risk for health declines. One suggested reason is that the stress of caregiving can increase inflammation and weaken the immune system.

For this study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Univer...

Kids With Autism 'In Tune' With Mom's Feelings: Study

Children with autism may have trouble interpreting facial emotions in strangers, but research finds some are as "in-tune" with their mother's expressions as kids without autism.

The study included 4- to 8-year-olds with and without autism who viewed five facial expressions -- happy, sad, angry, fearful and neutral -- on both familiar and unfamiliar faces.

Children without au...

Does Having Kids Make Couples Happier? New Study Says Yes, But …

Bringing home a bundle of joy really can make your life better, as long as money isn't too tight, new research suggests.

Previous studies have found that having children might reduce adults' happiness.

In the new study, researchers analyzed data from surveys of 1 million adults in Europe between 2009 and 2018. Respondents were asked to rank their life satisfaction on a scale...

Strengthening Family Ties Through Online Gaming

Video games provide unlimited entertainment, and interactive ones can even help you burn off calories.

But you may not know that playing games -- either in person or through shared online networks -- can unite family members from many generations in meaningful ways.

Researchers at Concordia University in Montreal found that playing social network games, through Facebook for ...

Cost Puts Sports, Art Programs Out of Reach for Many Families

After-school activities help develop social skills and talent, but a new report finds that many kids are priced out of participating.

In fact, for 1 in 6 middle and high school students, costs are the prime reason for not taking part in these activities. And the poorest students are two times less likely to participate, compared with their better-off peers, researchers reported in a n...

Burden of Autism in Teens Weighs Heaviest on Minorities, Poor

Autism exacts a heavy toll on the families of teens who struggle with the disorder, but the fight to get treatment and services is even harder among minorities who live in poverty, new research suggests.

"We must understand that many families parenting teens on the autism spectrum are also struggling to make ends meet while trying to navigate complex systems of care and get the help t...

1 in 3 Young Adults Suffers From Loneliness in U.S.

For young adults, drugs and distracted driving are well-recognized health threats. Far less attention is paid to loneliness.

But loneliness is common -- and it is a particular problem for people aged 18 to 24, a new study suggests.

"We have this stereotype of the lonely old person in poor health, and the robust, socially active young person," said James Maddux, a senior scho...

Coping With Diabetes Is a Family Affair

When Giuseppina Miller's 8-year-old son, Peter, was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, he necessarily got a lot of his parents' attention.

"We tried to adjust pretty well, but I was getting no sleep because I had to check his blood sugar in the middle of the night, and I was worried all the time. My two younger daughters felt the stress and ended up getting ignored a little bit," M...

Prenatal Vitamins Might Lower Risk of Second Child With Autism

Something as simple as taking prenatal vitamins during the first month of pregnancy might lower the odds of having a second child with autism.

As researchers explain in a new report, once one child has been diagnosed with autism, any subsequent children face a higher risk of having the developmental disorder.

But the study found that when moms in high-risk families took pren...

Long Work Weeks May Be Depressing, Especially for Women

Feeling trapped behind a desk, a counter or on the factory floor does no favors for the mind.

Now, research helps confirm that women with jobs that demand long hours may be more prone to depression.

Researchers found that compared with women who worked a standard 40-hour week, those who were on the clock 55 hours or more typically reported more depression symptoms.

One Plus of Texting, Social Media: Divorce Made Easier on Kids

There's lots to be concerned about when it comes to kids and modern forms of communication, such as social isolation and cyberbullying.

But a new study reports a bright side to all that texting and social media -- it keeps children connected to their parents after a divorce.

The researchers also found that when kids and the parent no longer living at home stayed in contact, ...

Too Often, Opioid Abuse Runs in the Family, Study Shows

When parents abuse prescription painkillers, their teenagers may follow their example, a new study finds.

The study of thousands of U.S. teenagers found that kids were 30 percent more likely to abuse prescription opioids if one of their parents had.

The results mirror what's been seen in past studies of substance use, including cigarette smoking: When parents do it, their ki...

Does Bullying Start at Home?

If you think that sibling rivalry can border on brutality at times, you won't be surprised by new research from British scientists.

They found that children are more likely to be bullied by a sibling if they have more than one, and firstborn children and older brothers are most likely to bully siblings, a new study finds.

"Sibling bullying is the most frequent form of family...

Moms, Are You Victims of 'Invisible Labor'?

Mothers not only take on the lion's share of physical chores, they also shoulder most of the "invisible labor" involved in making sure the household is humming along, new research suggests.

Going beyond cooking and laundry, this means the mental strain of making sure there's enough food for bag lunches, teacher meetings are on the calendar, and that science project gets done by tomorro...

Nature or Nurture? Twins Study Helps Sort Out Genes' Role in Disease

Two of every five common diseases are at least partially influenced by a person's genetics, the largest U.S. study of twins ever conducted finds.

Nearly 40 percent of 560 different diseases have a genetic component, while 25 percent are driven by environmental factors shared by twins who are growing up in the same household, the researchers reported.

Brain disorders were mos...

Look to Your Aunts, Uncles and Parents for Clues to Your Longevity

Your chances of inheriting genes linked to longevity are highest if you come from a family with many long-lived members, researchers say.

And that includes aunts and uncles, not just parents.

Using databases at the University of Utah and in the Dutch province of Zeeland, investigators analyzed the genealogies of nearly 315,000 people from over 20,000 families dating back to ...

What Makes for a Good Nursing Home?

Families of nursing home residents are more likely to be satisfied with facilities that have higher staffing levels and are nonprofits, a new study finds.

"The findings show that facility-level factors associated with higher family satisfaction are rather similar to the ones we already know predict resident satisfaction as well," said study leader Tetyana Shippee. She is an associate ...

How to Handle Holiday Stressors

While others are decking the halls, many people find the holidays trigger anxiety and depression.

Stress can arise from financial strain, dealing with difficult relatives or trying to create the perfect holiday, said Michelle Martel, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Kentucky.

Also, the holidays can bring up sad memories for people who have lost loved...

3 in 4 Americans Struggle With Loneliness

Folks feeling lonely as the holidays approach have a lot of company, a new study suggests.

Loneliness appears to be widespread among Americans, affecting three out of every four people, researchers have found.

Further, loneliness appears to spike at specific times during adulthood. Your late 20s, mid-50s and late 80s are times when you are most at risk of feeling lonely.

...

Autism, ADHD in One Child Tied to Raised Risk in Siblings

Autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are so closely linked that they not only run in families, but each increases the risk of the other in future siblings, a new study finds.

Younger siblings of children with autism have a 30-fold increased relative risk they'll be diagnosed with autism themselves. They're also nearly four times as likely to be diagnosed with ADH...

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