New features, new look and now mobile-responsive! No need to re-register.

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Environment".

05 Apr

Climate Change and Seasonal Allergies

Climate change is blasting allergy sufferers with pollen earlier and longer than normal.

26 Feb

Nature and Mental Health

Growing up surrounded by nature may protect your mental health.

20 Sep

Air Pollution and Brain Health

Air pollution may up the risk of dementia.

Health News Results - 311

COPD May Strike Women Harder Than Men

WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) appear to have a harder time than men with the progressive lung disorder, a new study suggests.

Smoking is its leading cause, and while women report smoking less than men, those with COPD have more trouble breathing, more frequent flare-ups and a poorer quality of life, researchers foun...

Cleaner Air Linked to Lower Asthma Rates in Kids

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution levels have been declining for years, and researchers can now show that cleaner air is linked to fewer kids developing asthma.

The new study looked at nine California communities. The researchers found that reductions in certain pollutants were tied to about a 20% reduction in the odds of children developing asthma, a chroni...

Lyme Disease Now a Threat in City Parks

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As deer populations have exploded across America, moving from forests to suburbs to urban parks, they have brought the threat of Lyme disease to millions of city dwellers, a new study finds.

In fact, the deer tick that spreads Lyme disease is as prevalent in many New York City parks as it is in areas known to be endemic for the bacterial dis...

More Back-to-Back Heat Waves Will Come With Climate Change

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Here's another health danger climate change will deliver in the coming years: New research warns that back-to-back heat waves that go on for days will become more common as the planet warms.

The elderly and the poor will be the least prepared to weather this threat, the investigators noted. But hospital ERs and emergency service providers wi...

Summer Is Tough for Asthma Sufferers

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Summertime can bring asthma sufferers a lot of misery, but lung experts say watching for warning signs of breathing trouble can guard against serious complications.

"As the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health, we think it's crucial for people with asthma to know as much as they can about the disease," said Dr. D...

Slowing Climate Change Could Cut Health Costs, Save Money

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tackling climate change makes economic sense, a new report claims.

The cost of cutting carbon emissions -- enough to meet the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement -- would be offset by reductions in health problems and deaths caused by air pollution, the researchers found.

"These health 'co-benefits' of climate change policy are wide...

E-Cigarettes Used in 5% of U.S. Homes With Kids

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As e-cigarettes gain fans, children may be losing out. New research suggests that vaping parents expose children to secondhand fumes that may be as harmful as tobacco smoke.

Nearly 5% of U.S. adults living with children use e-cigarettes, according to the study. And many of those kids have asthma.

"Although e-cigarette aerosols are...

Trees Really Do Help Keep a City Cool, Study Shows

FRIDAY, May 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Trees are cool -- and for cities, the more, the better.

That's because cities are heat islands, meaning they're significantly hotter than the rural and semi-rural areas around them.

Trees help reduce this heat island effect, and the cooling effect is strongest in neighborhoods with large numbers of trees, researchers discovered.

...

'Superbugs' Hang Out on Hospital Patients

FRIDAY, April 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you weren't already worried enough about what germs lurk in hospitals, a new study shows 'superbugs' are common on patients and the things they touch.

Even worse, these bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics, the researchers added.

"Hand hygiene narrative has largely focused on physicians, nurses and other frontline staf...

Get Back to Nature to Put Stress at Bay

SATURDAY, April 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A small daily dose of nature may be the perfect prescription for stress.

An eight-week study found that people who spent at least 20 minutes a day in places that made them feel connected to nature had significantly lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

This so-called "nature pill" could be a low-cost antidote to the negativ...

Hospital Privacy Curtains Could Be Breeding Ground for Germs

FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Privacy curtains in hospital rooms might offer patients some personal dignity, but they can also harbor dangerous, drug-resistant bacteria.

That's the claim of a new study where researchers took more than 1,500 samples from privacy curtains in 625 rooms at six skilled nursing facilities in Michigan. The samples were collected from the parts ...

Vehicle Exhaust Drives Millions of New Asthma Cases Annually

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Traffic pollution causes about 4 million new asthma cases in children worldwide each year, new research shows.

Two-thirds of these kids live in urban areas, according to the study by researchers at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

"Our findings suggest that millions of new cases of pediatric asthma could be prev...

Climate Change Could Worsen Sneezin' Season

WEDNESDAY, April 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Have you started feeling like your allergies are acting up earlier every year, or maybe they're lasting longer?

New research suggests it's not just your imagination -- climate change appears to be disrupting nature's usual calendar.

Areas with an earlier spring had a 14% higher rate of seasonal allergies (hay fever), the re...

Let Your Lawn Grow: It's Good for Bees, Won't Attract Ticks, Study Finds

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You now have an excuse to skip cutting the grass every weekend -- it's beneficial for the bees.

And mowing your lawn less often to provide native bees a better habitat won't lead to an increase in disease-carrying ticks, experts say.

When research ecologist Susannah Lerman began urging friends and colleagues to leave lawns a bit long...

Forested Counties Have Lower Medicare Costs, Study Finds

THURSDAY, April 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Getting back to nature may nurture your health, according to a new study that found U.S. counties with more forests and shrublands have lower Medicare costs.

The surprising conclusion comes from an analysis of health and environmental data from 3,086 of the 3,103 counties in the continental United States.

"We took the average of d...

How You Can Cut Grocery Costs and Prevent Food Waste

TUESDAY, April 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Though food waste is a huge problem in the United States, you can help tackle it and cut grocery costs at the same time.

About 40 percent of all edible food produced in the United States goes uneaten, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The average family of four throws away about $1,484 worth of food and drink each year, acc...

Fish Slime Could Hold Key to Beating 'Superbug' Infections

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists are looking to an unexpected source in the battle against drug-resistant bacteria: fish slime.

The researchers said that microbes in the protective mucus that coats young fish holds promise in fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria. These include the so-called "superbug" microbes that cause methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus au...

Spring Is the Sneezing Season

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Spring is in the air, and that can mean misery for people with seasonal allergies.

"Allergies affect millions in the U.S., and while is there no way to avoid irritants like pollen entirely, there are simple solutions to mitigate allergic reactions," said Dr. Joseph Cooke, chair of the department of medicine at New York-Presbyterian Queens Hos...

Do You Live in One of America's 'Healthiest Communities'?

TUESDAY, March 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The healthiest community in the United States is Douglas County in Colorado, according to the 2019 rankings just released by U.S. News & World Report.

The others in the top five healthiest communities are Los Alamos County in New Mexico; the city of Falls Church and Loudoun County, both in Virginia; and Broomfield County in Colorado, ac...

A Good Spring Clean Can Help Tame Seasonal Allergies

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When it's finally time to store away your winter coats and boots, it's also a good time to rid your home of the allergens that accumulated over the winter, an allergist suggests.

"If you aren't someone who regularly undertakes spring cleaning, consider tackling it this year," said Dr. Todd Mahr, president of the American College of Allergy, A...

Smoking Around Expectant Moms Can Harm Babies' Hearts

SUNDAY, March 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fathers-to-be who expose their pregnant partners to secondhand smoke put their babies at risk of heart defects, researchers warn.

For the new study, investigators in China reviewed 125 studies that included a total of nearly 9 million prospective parents and more than 137,000 babies with congenital heart defects.

Pesticides Tied to Autism Risk in Kids

THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are exposed to common pesticides, either while in the womb or in the first year of life, may be more likely to develop autism, a new study suggests.

While the researchers stressed that it's premature to say that pesticide exposure actually causes autism, they pointed out that theirs is not the first investigation to sound alarm...

The Moose: A Rare But Often Deadly Road Hazard

TUESDAY, March 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a good thing U.S. drivers are less likely to hit a moose than a deer. Because a run-in with a majestic bull moose is a whole lot deadlier, a new study finds.

The reason is simple -- moose are much larger than deer. Moose weigh 800 to 1,300 pounds and can reach 6 feet, 6 inches at the shoulder. When a car hits a moose, the impact is typ...

Many Parents Think Vaping Around Kids Is Fine

MONDAY, March 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents who smoke try to shield their kids from their unhealthy habit -- but those who vape may not take the same precautions, a new study suggests.

The study surveyed over 700 parents who smoked cigarettes, used e-cigarettes or both. The researchers found that most -- regardless of their product of choice -- had a "strict" smoke-free po...

AHA News: A Home Near 'Green Space' Could Cut Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Spending your golden years in a place with lots of trees and other vegetation can be visually pleasing – and it also might be good for your heart, according to a new study.

University of Miami researchers crunched the numbers to determine that nearly 250,000 Medicare recipients living in the greenest parts of Miami-Dad...

The Deadliest Plastic for Seabirds? Balloons

MONDAY, March 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- No plastic is good for seabirds, but new Australian research finds that balloon bits pose the most deadly threat to marine life.

"Balloons, or balloon fragments, were the marine debris most likely to cause mortality, and they killed almost one in five of the seabirds that ingested them," said study author Lauren Roman, a Ph.D. student at the U...

Major Flooding Can Bring Skin Infection Dangers

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Flooding from hurricanes and other natural disasters increases the risk of skin infections among victims and relief workers, a skin expert warns.

"In 2017, we experienced almost as many flooding events as we did throughout the previous 10 years," said Dr. Justin Bandino. He's an assistant professor of dermatology at San Antonio Military Medica...

Green Space Good for Your Child's Mental Health

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Living near a park, forest or other green space may protect your children's mental health later in life, a new Danish study suggests.

Children who grow up in these natural surroundings have up to a 55 percent lower risk of developing a mental disorder as an adult, researchers found.

Further, the protective effect grows stronger with...

Toxins in Home Furnishings Can Be Passed on to Kids

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children who live in homes with vinyl flooring and flame-retardant furniture have higher levels of potentially harmful chemicals in their blood or urine, researchers have found.

The new study included 203 children from 190 families who were tested for these chemicals -- so-called semi-volatile organic compounds (or SVOCs) -- in their blood...

How Color Can Help You De-Stress

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many studies have shown that color affects both mood and behavior. Color can help you go from sad to happy or angry to calm.

When it comes to mood, there are four primary colors. Though different shades within each of the four can have different effects, some generalities exist.

Red symbolizes power and strength and may even...

Hunting, Harvesting Leave Big Animals at Risk of Extinction: Study

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Humankind may be eating hundreds of species of large wild animals into extinction, a new study says.

Researchers looked at nearly 300 species of large animals (megafauna) -- defined as mammals and fish weighing 220 pounds or more, and amphibians, birds and reptiles weighing at least 88 pounds.

The investigators found that 70 percen...

Are Forests Now Playing a Role in Pollution?

FRIDAY, Feb. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Forests are changing in ways that could mean they emit more gases that contribute to smog, acid rain and respiratory problems, a new study suggests.

"This study has profound implications for future air quality. Human activities, such as fire suppression, fertilizer use and climate change, are causing forest populations to shift from stands of ...

Polar Vortex Brings Frostbite Danger: Protect Yourself

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Minus 29 Fahrenheit in Fargo, minus 28 in Minneapolis, minus 13 in Des Moines.

With potential record-setting low temperatures ahead for much of the nation, one expert warns that frostbite can quickly strike exposed skin.

"With wind chills approaching the single digits and below zero, it is possible to develop 'frostnip' with progr...

Climate Change Could Bring More Infant Heart Defects: Study

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change could lead to more U.S. babies born with congenital heart defects, researchers say.

Specifically, they concluded that hotter temperatures may lead to as many as 7,000 additional cases between 2025 and 2035 in eight representative states: Arkansas, Texas, California, Iowa, North Carolina, Georgia, New York and Utah.

...

Plunging Temperatures a Threat to People With Alzheimer's

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The polar vortex that has enveloped much of the United States this week poses a special danger to people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.

"This type of weather can be hazardous for everyone, but even more so for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease, who may have difficulty noticing temperature and weather changes...

Layer Up During the Polar Vortex

TUESDAY, Jan. 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As a giant polar vortex sweeps down over most of the United States, bringing with it temperatures so frigid that frostbite and hypothermia can happen within minutes, doctors have some advice for those who dare to venture outside.

The swath of the cold freeze is so wide and deep that roughly 75 percent of Americans living on the U.S. mainland...

Plant-Based Diets Good for the Planet, and for You

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A low-carbon diet -- one high in vegetables and grains -- is good for both your health and the planet, researchers say.

Food production is a major contributor to climate change, so researchers decided to examine the carbon footprint of more than 16,000 Americans' diets.

"People whose diets had a lower carbon footprint were eating les...

More Gun Owners, Higher Risk of Youth Suicides?

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Youth suicide rates are higher in U.S. states with greater rates of homes containing guns, a new study finds.

"This study demonstrates that the strongest single predictor of a state's youth suicide rate is the prevalence of household gun ownership in that state," said study co-author Michael Siegel. He is a professor of community health scienc...

Kids Exposed to Lead at Higher Odds for Mental Health Issues Later

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood lead exposure may trigger the development of long-term mental health problems, new research suggests.

The finding stems from a decades-long tracking of nearly 600 New Zealanders. All were born between 1972 and 1973. At that time, most gas products still contained high levels of lead. Lead exposure was assessed at age 11, followed ...

How to Safely Use Plastic Containers in Your Microwave

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For many, a microwave is indispensable, but questions remain about the safety of containers used to cook and reheat food in it.

Most of the controversy surrounds the chemicals used to make plastic containers soft or clear, like BPA and phthalates. These chemicals are called endocrine disrupters, because they can mimic hormones such as estr...

Is Air Pollution a Downer?

MONDAY, Jan. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may not only make it hard to breathe, but it may also make you unhappy, a new study suggests.

In China, air pollution reportedly causes an average of 1 million premature deaths each year and costs its economy $38 billion.

But it also affects people's happiness, according to researchers led by Siqi Zheng. She is an assoc...

Opioid Prescriptions Almost Twice as Likely for Rural vs. Urban Americans

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As the United States battles an epidemic of opioid abuse, people living in rural areas have nearly two times the odds of being prescribed the painkillers when compared to their urban peers.

That's the finding from a new study that suggests more must be done to curb opioid prescribing by doctors in rural America.

The research was ba...

Looming Global Crisis Means People's Diets Must Change: Experts

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The average person's daily diet will need to change drastically during the next three decades to make sure everyone is fed without depleting the planet, a panel of experts has concluded.

Global consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar will have to decrease by about half to make sure the Earth will be able to feed a growing population...

Climate Change Already Hurting Human Health, Review Shows

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change is already having clear effects on human health, according to a new review that describes the situation as a "health emergency."

"Climate change is causing injuries, illnesses and deaths now from heat waves, infectious diseases, food and water insecurity, and changes in air quality, among other adverse health outcomes," said ...

Recycling: A Renewed Effort Is Needed

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most people know how important recycling is for a healthier environment, yet a survey by the Pew Research Center showed that Americans may not always put that knowledge into practice.

Though most people in the United States have access to recycling programs, the rules and practices vary within states and even within communities. Only 28 per...

Nature or Nurture? Twins Study Helps Sort Out Genes' Role in Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Two of every five common diseases are at least partially influenced by a person's genetics, the largest U.S. study of twins ever conducted finds.

Nearly 40 percent of 560 different diseases have a genetic component, while 25 percent are driven by environmental factors shared by twins who are growing up in the same household, the researchers re...

Happiness High in States With Lots of Parks, Libraries

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of parks, libraries and natural resources in the state where you reside might have a great deal to do with how happy you are.

New research suggests that Americans who live where more money is spent on these "public goods" are happier than their counterparts in other states.

"Public goods are things you can't exclude people...

Here's How the Government Shutdown Could Affect Your Health

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Tainted food, trash-filled parklands and even hungry kids: Public health could be increasingly at risk as the U.S. government shutdown drags into its 21st day, experts say.

Crucial inspections intended to protect Americans have either been curtailed or are not being performed because the responsible federal workers have been furloughed, said ...

Friends' Vaping Could Pose Danger to Kids With Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Add another danger that e-cigarettes pose to teenagers: A new study finds secondhand exposure to vaping may raise the chances of asthma attacks in adolescents with the respiratory condition.

Middle school and high school students with asthma were 27 percent more likely to have suffered an asthma attack if they'd been exposed to vapor from so...

Teens Who Hurt Themselves More Likely to Hurt Others

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who harm themselves are three times more likely to commit violent crimes than those who don't, a new study reveals.

"We know that some individuals who self-harm also inflict harm on others," said study author Leah Richmond-Rakerd, from Duke University.

"What has not been clear is whether there are early-life characteristics or ...

Show All Health News Results

Wellness Library Results - 1

Long before scientists learned how to split the atom, our planet has been radioactive. The rocks and dirt all over the globe crackle with small amounts of uranium, a natural ore that constantly releases radiation. As it decays, uranium also produces radon, a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas that's all around us. Some places have more uranium -- and radon -- than others. In central Montana, peo...

Show All Wellness Library Results