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Are Shorter Folks at Higher Risk for Type 2 Diabetes?

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being shorter than average can bring numerous annoyances, but a new study suggests it might also heighten a person's odds for type 2 diabetes.

The German study found that each additional 10 centimeters (about 4 inches) of height was linked to a 41% lower risk of type 2 diabetes in men and a 33% lower risk in women.

"We ...

Diabetes Control Has Stalled Across U.S.

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. adults with diabetes are no more likely to meet disease control targets than they were in 2005, a new study finds.

Typically, diabetes treatment focuses on controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, as well as not smoking.

For the study, Massachusetts General Hospital researchers analyzed data on diabetes ca...

Lifestyle May Matter More Than Your Genes in Early Heart Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An unhealthy lifestyle is a bigger contributor to heart disease than genetics for many younger adults, according to a new study.

The findings show that good health habits should be a key part of prevention efforts, even in people with a family history of early heart disease, researchers said.

The study inc...

Rising Obesity Rates Undermining Strides Made Against Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Aug. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Rising obesity rates, coupled with an associated jump in diabetes and high blood pressure cases, appears to be undoing decades of gains made against heart disease, a new study finds.

After 2010, the rate of deaths from heart disease continued to drop, but more slowly. Deaths from stroke leveled off, and deaths from high blood pressure ("hyper...

Fish Oil Not a Magic Pill Against Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It would be welcome news to millions if fish oil supplements were proven to help prevent diabetes. But new research delivers very disappointing data on the prospect.

Previous research has hinted that fish oil supplements -- which contain omega-3 fatty acids -- might improve blood sugar metabolism and possibly stave off type 2 diabetes. Bu...

Asian Study Finds Diabetes, Heart Failure a Dangerous Duo

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Asian heart failure patients who also have type 2 diabetes can develop changes in the structure of their heart and are at increased risk for hospitalizations and premature death, a new study finds.

Diabetes is on the rise worldwide, and it's common for patients to have both diabetes and heart failure.

There has been extensive rese...

'No Quick Fix' for A-Fib, But Cardiologist Says You Can Help Prevent It

MONDAY, Aug. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There is no cure for a-fib, but the common heart disorder can be managed, an expert says.

Atrial fibrillation -- which can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications -- affects as many as 6 million people in the United States. It's more common in whites than in blacks and Hispanics, and more common among m...

Caring Doctors Can Be Life-Changing for Diabetic Patients

MONDAY, Aug. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A kind, understanding doctor could spell the difference between life or death for diabetes patients, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that patients had a lower risk of early death if their primary care doctor exhibited empathy.

The study included 628 patients in the U.K. with type 2 diabetes. A year after their diagnos...

Keto Diet May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

MONDAY, Aug. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The keto diet has plenty of weight-loss devotees who swear by the high fat, low-carb plan. Now, new research from India suggests it may benefit people with type 2 diabetes.

The study team found that people following a ketogenic diet for three months saw significant improvement in their blood sugar control.

"A five to 10% carbohy...

More 'Buyer Beware' Warnings for Unregulated Stem Cell Clinics

THURSDAY, Aug. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Folks who get treatment from a stem cell clinic could be spending their money on what amounts to snake oil, a new study warns.

Doctors administering stem cells might have no expertise in the condition they're trying to treat, and the cells themselves might be derived from questionable or discredited sources -- if the treatment contains any stem...

FDA Approves First Needle-Free 'Rescue' Drug for Low Blood Sugar Episodes

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In what could prove to be a real advance for Americans with diabetes, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday gave the nod to a needle-free method of helping people recover from an episode of dangerous low blood sugar.

The new formulation, called Baqsimi, contains the rescue medication glucagon, but is instead given as a nasally i...

Plant-Based Diet Helps Keep Diabetes at Bay

THURSDAY, July 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Turns out that the old adage -- an apple a day keeps the doctor away -- may actually be true. New research suggests that the more plant foods you eat, the lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.

People who ate a mostly plant-based diet reduced their risk of diabetes by 23%, the study found.

The association was even stronger -- a ...

Diabetes Raises Heart Failure Risk More in Women Than Men

FRIDAY, July 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes brings with it a variety of long-term complications, but at least one of those -- heart failure -- is a bigger threat to women than men, new research suggests.

The risk difference was even more pronounced for women with type 1 diabetes.

"Our global review of 12 million people shows that having diabetes increases the risk of...

Just 300 Fewer Calories a Day Brings a Health Benefit

FRIDAY, July 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you trim out only 300 calories a day -- the equivalent of six Oreo cookies -- that could be all it takes to cut diabetes and heart disease risk, new research suggests.

In the study, just over 200 adults younger than 50 with a healthy weight or just a few extra pounds were told to reduce their calorie intake by 25% for two years. Their a...

Can You Live Well With Type 1 Diabetes for 81 Years? Just Ask Don Ray

WEDNESDAY, July 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1939, Don Ray was just 4 years old. Doctors told his parents he'd likely live well into his teens.

By the time he hit his teens, the management of type 1 diabetes had progressed far enough that a doctor predicted he might live well into his 30s. Yet another doctor improved on that prognosis and ...

More Americans Are Eating Whole Grains, But Intake Still Too Low

TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The popularity of heart-healthy whole grains is on the rise among Americans, but levels are still far below those recommended by nutritionists, a new report shows.

Overall, whole grains -- products with 100% whole grains or made with whole grain flour -- made up almost 16% of total grain intake on any given day in 2016.

That'...

Easing Depression Can Bring Longer Life to People With Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, July 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Treating depression may have an added benefit for people with diabetes -- longer life.

A large new study from Taiwan found that antidepressants cut the risk of dying during the study period by more than one-third for people with diabetes and depression.

"The first nationwide population-based study showed antidepressant use was as...

Medtronic Recalls Some Insulin Pumps as FDA Warns They Could Be Hacked

FRIDAY, June 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday that some high-tech insulin pumps made by Medtronic are being recalled for potential cybersecurity risks that could leave them vulnerable to hacking.

"An unauthorized person with special technical skills and equipment could potentially connect wirelessly to a nearby insulin pump to chan...

More Education Could Mean Less Heart Disease

TUESDAY, June 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New research offers a compelling case for staying in school: American adults who spent more time in the classroom as kids have a lower risk of heart disease.

"As a society, we should be thinking about investing in social policies to improve overall health and reduce health care costs," said study author Dr. Rita Hamad. She's an assistant pro...

Heart Disease Is Lasting Threat to Breast Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, June 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who survive breast cancer may have a higher risk for developing heart disease, a new study says.

Heart problems can appear more than five years after radiation treatment for breast cancer, and the added risk persists for as much as 30 years, according to Brazilian researchers.

Heart disease is the leading cause of...

Common Infant Vaccine May Also Shield Kids From Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, June 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating against the common infant infection rotavirus not only cuts a child's odds of getting sick, it might also prevent them from developing type 1 diabetes later in life, new research suggests.

Infants who got all of the recommended doses of the "stomach flu" virus vaccine had a 33% lower risk of developing type 1 diabetes compared ...

Type 1 Diabetes Might Affect Young Kids' Brain Development

THURSDAY, June 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at an early age have slowed growth in brain areas linked to mild cognitive deficits, new research suggests.

The study compared MRIs of the brain in kids with type 1 diabetes to age-matched children without the condition. Researchers also saw that areas of slower brain growth were associated with higher...

Drug May Help Delay Onset of Type 1 Diabetes

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A two-year delay in the onset of type 1 diabetes could make a big difference for people with the disease. And researchers say a new drug may make that postponement possible.

Researchers gave the drug teplizumab or a placebo to a small group of people who were nearly certain to develop type 1 diabetes, based on genetics and certain symptoms. Th...

Vitamin D Supplements Don't Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Study

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin supplements don't appear to prevent type 2 diabetes in those at highest risk for the disease, a new study finds.

Some studies have suggested that low vitamin D levels might increase the odds of developing diabetes and that boosting levels could prevent it, but these findings throw cold water on these assumptions.

In this st...

What and How You Eat Affects Your Odds for Type 2 Diabetes

SATURDAY, June 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The kind of foods you eat, and even the order in which you eat them can affect your odds of developing type 2 diabetes, three new studies suggest.

The studies -- being presented to the American Society for Nutrition -- found:

  • Switching to a mostly plant-based diet (but one that could still include m...

Midlife Diabetes Can Really Raise Your Odds for Stroke Years Later

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that further confirms the link between type 2 diabetes and stroke, a new study shows that having the blood sugar disease during middle age may boost your risk of having the most common type of stroke later in life.

In addition to a 30% greater chance of an ischemic stroke, the researchers also found that people who had type 2...

AHA News: Diabetes and Heart Failure Are Linked; Treatment Should Be Too

THURSDAY, June 6, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Having Type 2 diabetes or heart failure independently increases the risk for getting the other, and both often occur together, further worsening a patient's health, quality of life and care costs, a new report says.

Many of the risk factors and mechanisms behind Type 2 diabetes and heart failure are similar, yet there's a la...

Tight Diabetes Control Alone May Not Benefit the Heart Long-Term

WEDNESDAY, June 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetes is a known risk factor for heart disease, and researchers thought that five years of really tight blood sugar control might reduce the risk of heart disease for years to come.

But a new 15-year follow-up study found that was not the case. The findings suggest it might be more important to control other risk factors for heart...

Open Communication Helps Teens Manage Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a simple concept, but new research reinforces the idea: Teens with type 1 diabetes benefit when they feel their concerns have been heard.

Teens with type 1 diabetes may experience anger, frustration and anxiety if they haven't met their treatment goals. Their parents and health care providers may also feel frustrated and may blame the t...

New Gene Variants for Type 2 Diabetes Found

THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It has long been known that lifestyle affects a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Now, researchers report that they have identified rare variants of four genes that may also play a part.

For the study, an international team of scientists analyzed protein-coding genes from nearly 21,000 people with type 2 diabetes and 25,000 people...

Post-Hospital Low Blood Sugar a Danger to Diabetics

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If you are a diabetes patient, can having low blood sugar levels when you are discharged from the hospital be dangerous to your health?

That's what a new study discovered: Those patients had a 40% increased risk of readmission and an increased risk of early death.

"We found that patients with diabetes who are discharged with low...

AHA News: Why Are Women With Diabetes at Greater Risk for Poor Heart Health?

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Diabetes can be a risk factor for heart disease – but for women, the condition can lead to worse outcomes than for men.

The statistics are striking: Compared to their male counterparts, women with diabetes have a twofold increased risk of heart disease. They're also more likely to have heart attacks earlier – and ...

Philadelphia's Soda Tax Tied to Big Drop in Sales

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Soda taxes appear to be an effective weapon in the war on obesity and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

In January 2017, Philadelphia began taxing sugary and artificially sweetened drinks, and in that year their sales in chain food stores dropped 38%. But it's too soon to know if better health will be the result, experts say.

...

Weight Before Pregnancy Most Important to Risk for Complications

TUESDAY, May 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Expectant mothers and doctors have focused a lot on how much a woman gains during pregnancy, but new research suggests how much a woman weighs before getting pregnant may be far more important.

The study found that the more a woman weighed at the start of her pregnancy, the more likely she was to experience complications such as high bl...

AHA News: Study Backs Lower Blood Pressure Target for People With Diabetes

MONDAY, April 29, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- While doctors have been divided about what level of blood pressure is safe for someone with diabetes, a new study suggests that more intensive intervention is better.

During the study, people with Type 2 diabetes who received treatment to keep their blood pressure levels at 130/80 or below had fewer heart attacks, strokes a...

Newer Diabetes Drug Shows Promise in Kids, Teens

TUESDAY, April 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A type 2 diabetes drug for adults also controls blood sugar levels in children and teens with the disease, researchers report.

Type 2 diabetes is on the rise among children and teens, but they have fewer treatment choices than adults, the study authors said. Currently, the only drugs approved for treatment of children and teens with type 2 d...

Half of Older Dialysis Patients Die Within a Year, Study Finds

THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The death rate for older Americans receiving dialysis for kidney failure may be nearly twice as high as widely thought, according to a new report.

For the study, researchers looked at 391 Medicare patients, aged 65 and older, who started dialysis, in which a machine is used to remove toxins from the blood.

Nearly 23% of the p...

Microbes in Diabetic Foot Ulcers May Help Predict Treatment Success

THURSDAY, April 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Some strains of Staph bacteria may slow the healing of diabetic foot ulcers, while other types of bacteria may promote healing, according to a new study.

The results suggest that monitoring the bacterial populations (microbiomes) of diabetic foot ulcers may help doctors decide the best way to treat them.

Up to one-quarter of diabe...

Buyer Beware When Purchasing Medical Test Strips

WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Test strips help millions monitor their health at home, but people should avoid buying strips that are pre-owned or not approved for sale in the United States.

Using such strips could lead to incorrect test results that could put people at risk for serious problems and even death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

What ...

Common Diabetes Drug May Also Shield Kidneys, Heart

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A common diabetes drug may also greatly reduce the odds for death from kidney failure and heart disease in diabetes patients with kidney disease, a new study finds.

The news on Invokana (canagliflozin) is important, experts say, because diabetes and kidney trouble so often go together.

"Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failur...

'Added Sugars' Label on Foods Could Save Many Lives

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new Nutrition Facts label that highlights the amount of added sugars in food could prevent nearly 1 million cases of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

The new label, first proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May 2016, adds a new line under the Total Carbohydrate category that details the amount of s...

AHA News: Medical School Project Pushes Healthy Habits 'Beyond Hospital Walls'

THURSDAY, April 11, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- During her third year of medical school, Terry Gao learned how classroom training doesn't always answer real-world questions -- like how to get people to eat better.

As part of an internal medicine rotation at a hospital, she treated patients who returned again and again with the same ailments, especially heart disease and...

The Earlier You Develop Type 2 Diabetes, the Greater Your Heart Risks

TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults and women with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of developing heart disease -- and dying from it, a new study says.

The findings suggest "we need to be more aggressive in controlling risk factors in younger type 2 diabetes populations and especially in women," said lead author Dr. Naveed Sattar.

Sattar is a professor o...

High Insulin Costs Come Under Fire on Capitol Hill

WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For many Americans, the cost of lifesaving insulin is simply too high, leading as many as one in four to ration the drug, experts testifying before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce said this week.

The meeting focused primarily on defining the problem and exploring potential solutions, such as lowering the list prices of insulin an...

Common Diabetes Test May Often Miss the Mark

MONDAY, March 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A commonly used diabetes test may not spot the disease as well as an older test does, a new study suggests.

The researchers said the newer test -- called hemoglobin A1C -- didn't catch three-quarters of the diabetes diagnoses found by the older test -- called an oral glucose tolerance test.

"Diabetes is a global epidemic. Since the...

Stay Away From Sugary Sodas, Spare Your Heart

MONDAY, March 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People who regularly down sugar-laden sodas, juices and sports drinks aren't doing their heart any favors.

A new study of more than 110,000 U.S. health professionals found that the more people drank sugary beverages, the higher their risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

People who consumed at least two per day were about one-t...

Which Type of Exercise Might Lower Your Diabetes Risk?

MONDAY, March 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Boosting your muscle strength could help ward off type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

Even moderate amounts of resistance exercise may help prevent type 2 diabetes, said the study's corresponding author, Duck-chul Lee. He's an associate professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University.

For the study, Lee's team tracked more than...

First Steps After a Diabetes Diagnosis

THURSDAY, March 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor is likely to start you on a program to lower blood sugar and help insulin work more efficiently -- a regimen that may include a modified diet, exercise and possibly medication.

Starting (or ramping up) an exercise program can be the hardest of all these lifestyle changes. Typical exercise guid...

Low-Carb Diets Linked to Higher Odds for A-Fib

WEDNESDAY, March 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Keto, Paleo, Atkins -- there's no shortage of low-carb diets to try, but new research suggests that over time, living low-carb can raise your risk of a heart condition called atrial fibrillation, or a-fib.

People who regularly got fewer than 45 percent of their calories from carbohydrates were 18 percent more likely to develop a-fib than p...

Coping With Diabetes Is a Family Affair

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- When Giuseppina Miller's 8-year-old son, Peter, was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, he necessarily got a lot of his parents' attention.

"We tried to adjust pretty well, but I was getting no sleep because I had to check his blood sugar in the middle of the night, and I was worried all the time. My two younger daughters felt the stress and...

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