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Health News Results - 532

Are You a Risk-Taker? It Might Lie in Your Genes

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Do you shy away from risky business or cast caution aside and go for it?

Either way, your answer could come from your DNA.

Scientists have identified more than 100 genetic variants linked with risk-taking, according to a groundbreaking new study.

"Genetic variants that are associated with overall risk tolerance -- a measu...

Ditch Your Leisure To-Do List

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If the fun is often missing from your social activities or play feels like work, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have an explanation: You're probably overplanning.

With so many demands on your time, precise scheduling might be the only way to accomplish everything you want. But while that can help at work and with fami...

Protecting Seniors From Scammers

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It seems as though every day brings warnings about phone and internet scammers, with older Americans being particularly vulnerable.

The Federal Trade Commission estimates that 7.3 percent of adults between the ages of 65 and 74, and 6.5 percent of those aged 75 and older, are victims of financial fraud to the tune of billions of dollars. If yo...

Cancer Diagnosis May Quadruple Suicide Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of suicide is more than four times higher among Americans with cancer than those without the disease, a new study finds.

"Even though cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, most cancer patients do not die from cancer, the patients usually die of another cause," said researcher Nicholas Zaorsky, a radiati...

Recycling: A Renewed Effort Is Needed

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most people know how important recycling is for a healthier environment, yet a survey by the Pew Research Center showed that Americans may not always put that knowledge into practice.

Though most people in the United States have access to recycling programs, the rules and practices vary within states and even within communities. Only 28 per...

Want to Live Longer? Just Sit a Bit Less Each Day

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Take a stand for a longer life.

Researchers say even a few extra minutes off the sofa each day can add years to your life span.

"If you have a job or lifestyle that involves a lot of sitting, you can lower your risk of early death by moving more often, for as long as you want and as your ability allows -- whether that means taking a...

Foot Stools Move Human Stool Along

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A simple potty stool under your feet might help cure constipation, researchers say.

"These toilet stools became popular through things like viral videos and social media, but there was really no medical evidence to show whether or not they are effective," said researcher Dr. Peter Stanich. He is an assistant professor of gastroenterology, he...

See Who's More Likely to Share Fake News

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 9 percent of Americans shared fake news in 2016, but seniors were far more likely to do so than young adults, a new study finds.

"Despite widespread interest in the fake news phenomenon, we know very little about who actually shares fake news," said study author Joshua Tucker, a professor of politics at New York University.

...

Teens Who Hurt Themselves More Likely to Hurt Others

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who harm themselves are three times more likely to commit violent crimes than those who don't, a new study reveals.

"We know that some individuals who self-harm also inflict harm on others," said study author Leah Richmond-Rakerd, from Duke University.

"What has not been clear is whether there are early-life characteristics or ...

'Meaningful' Activities May Mean Healthier Old Age

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who find meaning in their daily activities may remain in better health as they age, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that when middle-aged and older adults felt their days held meaningful activities, they tended to report better health and well-being four years later.

Not only were they less likely to develop physi...

Catching Up on News About Catch-Up Sleep

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Missing out on needed sleep can bring a host of health woes, including diabetes because a lack of sleep affects insulin levels.

It also leaves you less alert and less able to focus.

And get only four or five hours of sleep a night, and problems can develop even if your sleep loss is short-term.

A number of studies have been ...

Will Cutting Out Booze for 'Dry January' Help Your Health?

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- "Dry January" is the self-improvement meme of the moment, with people around the world pledging to take a break from alcohol this month.

"Basically, it's a New Year's resolution," said Dr. Scott Krakower, assistant unit chief of psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital, in Glen Oaks, N.Y. "You've been drinking during the holidays, and the idea ...

A Smooth Move Makes for a Happier Child

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Moving from one community to another can be difficult for everyone in the family, especially if leaving friends and relatives behind. But the problems can be magnified for kids who have to switch middle or high schools.

Studies show that, for high school students, moving just once in a 12-month period can cut in half the likelihood of their g...

Mindfulness Can Help Tame Everyday Stress

TUESDAY, Jan. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Being in tune with the present moment -- called mindfulness -- can relieve stress and make you an actor rather than a reactor, a wellness expert says.

Focusing on what's happening right now allows people to notice things they might otherwise miss, said Dr. Timothy Riley. He is an assistant professor in the family and community medicine depart...

Staying Young at Heart

TUESDAY, Jan. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You're only as old as you feel.

It's a common expression that has some science behind it, thanks to a study from University College London in England.

The researchers set out to learn if people who feel younger than their chronological age actually live longer. They looked at information from about 6,500 participants. The info...

Good Sleep Helps Kids Become Slimmer, Healthier Teens: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Regular bedtimes and adequate sleep during childhood may contribute toward a healthy weight in the teen years, a new study finds.

The study included nearly 2,200 kids in 20 U.S. cities. One-third of them had consistent, age-appropriate bedtimes between ages 5 and 9, according to their mothers.

Compared to that group, those who had no...

Kidney Disease Risk Tied to Sugar-Sweetened Drinks

THURSDAY, Dec. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who drink lots of sugar-sweetened drinks may be putting themselves at a heightened risk for kidney disease, a new study suggests.

The study of more than 3,000 black men and women in Mississippi found that those who consumed the most soda, sweetened fruit drinks and water had a 61 percent increased risk of developing chronic kidney di...

Loneliness Doesn't Take a Holiday

TUESDAY, Dec. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Though this is the time of year when family and friends gather and connect, loneliness remains a serious public health issue in the United States, an expert on aging says.

More and more Americans are lonely, and there's growing evidence that it can pose significant health risks.

Nearly one-third of older Americans are lonely, and ch...

How to Handle Holiday Stressors

TUESDAY, Dec. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While others are decking the halls, many people find the holidays trigger anxiety and depression.

Stress can arise from financial strain, dealing with difficult relatives or trying to create the perfect holiday, said Michelle Martel, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Kentucky.

Also, the holidays can bring up ...

Building the Bonds of Friendship

TUESDAY, Dec. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's well known that having friends plays a big part in our emotional and physical well-being. And while friendships make life more rewarding at every age, we're now learning that as we get older, quality becomes more important than quantity.

But friendships are harder to make as we age, so it's important to build on the ones you have.

...

It Really Is Better to Give Than Receive

MONDAY, Dec. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The joy of giving really does last longer than the joy of receiving, researchers report.

Experiments with hundreds of participants found their happiness did not decrease, or decreased much slower, if they repeatedly gave small amounts of money to others instead of repeatedly receiving money.

The findings suggest that "repeated giving...

Take Time for 'Me Time'

MONDAY, Dec. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Husband or wife, mom or dad, the demands on your time can be overwhelming. But even if there's no end to your to-do list, securing some time for yourself is a must.

While scheduling a mani-pedi or catching a ball game with friends is great, simply closing your office or bedroom door for 30 minutes can give you the time you need to recharge.

#MeToo Sparked Surge in Awareness About Sexual Harassment: Study

FRIDAY, Dec. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hundreds of thousands of women have used the #MeToo hashtag to speak out about sexual harassment and assault during the past year.

Now there's evidence that the #MeToo movement sparked more than mere conversation about sexual abuse in the United States.

Google searches for information about sexual harassment and assault -- as...

Stress Keeps 1 in 3 Americans Up at Night

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans are losing sleep as economic and political stress keeps them tossing and turning at night, a new study finds.

In 2013, about 30 percent of Americans said they slept six hours or less at night, but that number rose to 33 percent by 2017, researchers found.

Lead study author Jennifer Ailshire, an assistant prof...

Narcissists Not Fond of Democracy: Study

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You probably know a narcissist -- someone who believes he or she is the best at everything and has little regard for others. Now, new research suggests narcissists also tend to have little regard for democracy.

For the study, researchers examined support for democracy in the United States and Poland. The investigators found that narcissists...

Wearing Contacts 24/7 Can Bring Infection, Blindness, Doctors Warn

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Dangerous infections, blinding ulcers in the eyes: These are just some of the troubles that can come from wearing your contacts for too long.

Contact lenses are generally considered safe, but wearing them while asleep significantly raises the risk of developing serious complications that can cause permanent visual loss, the U.S. Centers fo...

3 in 4 Americans Struggle With Loneliness

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Folks feeling lonely as the holidays approach have a lot of company, a new study suggests.

Loneliness appears to be widespread among Americans, affecting three out of every four people, researchers have found.

Further, loneliness appears to spike at specific times during adulthood. Your late 20s, mid-50s and late 80s are times when ...

Healthy Sleep Habits for Kids Pay Off

FRIDAY, Dec. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Good sleep routines can help children get the rest they need, researchers say.

For the new report, investigators reviewed 44 studies from 16 countries in North America, Europe and Asia. The studies included a total nearly 300,000 children, aged 4 months to 18 years.

"Good sleep hygiene gives children the ...

Chain Restaurants Serve Up More Calories Than Fast Food Spots Worldwide

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Fast food gets a lot of blame for rising obesity rates, but meals at chain restaurants contain even more calories, two new international studies show.

The first study assessed the calories in 13,500 meals from six fast-food and 21 full-service restaurant chains in the United Kingdom. The researchers found an average of 751 calories in main...

Intimacy: The Elusive Fountain of Youth?

THURSDAY, Dec. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People seeking more satisfaction in their later years might find sex is the spice of life, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers analyzed survey data from nearly 6,900 older adults, average age 65, in England. The investigators found that those who said they'd had any type of sexual activity in the previous 12 months had higher l...

Extreme Dieting in Teens Often Intensifies in Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Extreme dieting behaviors often begin in the teen years and worsen in adulthood, a new study finds.

Unhealthy weight-control behaviors -- such as purging and fasting -- are associated with problems later in life, including eating disorders, depression and substance abuse, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota.

"...

Hospitalizations Rising Among the Homeless

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- On any given night in America, more than 550,000 people are homeless, and they are being hospitalized in greater numbers, a new study suggests.

Despite expanded Medicaid and increased funds for health care clinics, hospitalizations among this vulnerable population are rising, said lead researcher Dr. Rishi Wadhera. He is with the Smith Cent...

When Heart Attack Strikes, Women Often Hesitate to Call for Help

TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Women often delay calling for emergency help when heart attack symptoms start, a new study finds.

Researchers in Switzerland found that women suffering a heart attack typically waited 37 minutes longer than men before calling an ambulance. And those delays showed no signs of improving over the 16-year study period.

One reason may be...

Hospital Discharge at Christmastime May Not Be a Gift for Some

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- No one wants to spend the holidays in a hospital bed, but heading home might not be a good idea, new research suggests.

The risk of hospital readmission or death was higher among patients who were discharged over the two-week December holiday period than at other times of the year, Canadian researchers found.

...

Sleep, Don't Cram, Before Finals for Better Grades

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's a college tradition to pull "all-nighters" during final exams. But students may get better grades if they simply go to bed early, two new studies suggest.

Researchers found that students who met an "8-hour sleep challenge" during finals week did better on their exams than those who slept less.

The results prove that the college ...

Catnip: The 'Why' Behind Cats' Favorite High

MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Rolling around, meowing and generally acting blissed-out: cats love the plant known as catnip.

Now, British scientists say they're closer to knowing how catnip works -- and their insights might end up helping felines' two-legged friends.

The substance in catnip that intoxicates cats is nepetalactone, explained a team led by Benjamin ...

Family, School Support May Help Stop Bullies in Their Tracks

FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children with strong family ties and school support are more likely to try to stop bullying when they see it, new research suggests.

The study included 450 sixth-graders and 446 ninth-graders who were asked about their relationships with their family, friends and teachers.

The students were then presented with six scenarios of specif...

Smokers Who Roll Their Own Less Likely to Quit

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers who roll their own cigarettes are less likely to try to kick the habit and cost may be the reason why, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 38,000 adults in England who were smokers or who had quit in the past year. About 56 percent said they smoked only factory-made cigarettes, while nearly 37 percent said t...

Are You a Victim of 'Clean Plate' Syndrome?

TUESDAY, Dec. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If your belly is full from a delicious holiday feast but there's one more sweet left on the dessert tray, will you hold back or yield to temptation?

New research suggests that you'll give in, driven by a widely shared attitude towards food that prompts you to "clean the plate," even if you're not really still hungry.

It's a form of "...

Another Tally Puts Autism Cases at 1 in 40

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Yet another study reveals that autism is far more common than once thought, with nearly 3 percent of American children diagnosed with the disorder.

A federal study published last week reported that one in 40 children have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and a second study that was published online Dec. 3 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics

Old-Fashioned Play Beats Digital Toys for Kids, Pediatricians Say

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're shopping for toys this holiday season, make sure some simple, old-fashioned items are on your list, pediatricians say.

In a new report, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is making recommendations on the best toys to buy for babies and young children. The bottom line: The traditional beats the digital.

"This report is ...

Are You Married to Bickering?

MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you bicker a lot with your spouse, it could be because you're running low on energy. Low energy translates to less self-control and a greater chance of aggression.

The good news: A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that a steady blood glucose level can translate into fewer fights with your sp...

Untangling the Ties Between Troubled Teens and Pot Use

FRIDAY, Nov. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Teens with behavioral problems are more likely than others to use marijuana -- but the drug itself doesn't increase conduct problems, a new study indicates.

The findings suggest that a "cascading chain of events" predict marijuana use problems as teens become young adults, according to the University of Pennsylvania researchers.

"Can...

Working More, But Getting Less Done?

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's no surprise that many Americans are working overtime. Conservative estimates say that 19 percent of adults put in 48 hours or more a week and 7 percent log in 60 or more.

But what you might not realize is that, after a certain point, extra hours could be hurting both your health and your productivity.

In addition to a variety ...

What Couch Potatoes Don't Know Can Hurt Them

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The fastest way to get a sedentary person moving is to tell them the specific health dangers of inactivity, a new report suggests.

For the study, researchers surveyed 615 Australian adults, aged 18 to 77, about their levels of physical activity, as well as their knowledge about the benefits of exercise and the dangers of being a couch potat...

Healthy Ways to Deal With Conflict

TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Almost every relationship will be affected by conflict at some point.

Whether it's with a spouse or a child, a co-worker or friend, there are healthy ways to address and resolve these problems, according to experts at the University of Texas at Austin Counseling and Mental Health Center.

Differences of opinion are usually at the roo...

Newly Mapped Genes May Hold Keys to ADHD

MONDAY, Nov. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of American kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have a genetic vulnerability to the disease, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 55,000 individuals and identified 12 gene regions linked with ADHD. These regions probably affect the central nervous system, the study authors said. The...

Night Shift Plus Unhealthy Habits Equals Higher Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Rotating night-shift work together with an unhealthy lifestyle significantly increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, researchers say.

"Most cases of type 2 diabetes could be prevented by adherence to a healthy lifestyle, and the benefits could be larger in rotating night-shift workers," said study authors led by Zhilei Shan. He is a nutritio...

How Long Will Your Teen Live? Personality Might Tell

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Does your teenager's personality actually predict how long he or she will live?

Yes, claims new research that finds high school students who tend to be calm, empathetic and intellectually curious are more likely to still be alive 50 years later than their peers who are less so.

The finding does not prove that certain traits in ado...

1 in 4 U.S. Adults Sits More Than 8 Hours a Day

TUESDAY, Nov. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Couch Potato Nation: Nearly half of Americans sit for far too many hours a day and don't get any exercise at all, a new study finds.

A survey of some 5,900 adults found that nearly 26 percent sit for more than eight hours a day, 45 percent don't get any moderate or vigorous exercise during the week, and about 11 percent sit more than eight h...

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Wellness Library Results - 3

By now your child has reached elementary school age and you feel pretty well in tune with his personality -- his shyness is just part of the package. Still, you wonder how you can make life easier for him. The key is to avoid the two opposing -- and perhaps equally strong -- temptations to pressure and overprotect him. Trying to get him to be more outgoing will only make him retreat. And shelterin...

What is attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder? ADHD (commonly known as ADD) is a behavioral disorder. Basically, children who have it are unable to concentrate, excessively active, or both. The American Psychiatric Association calls the distinct types "inattentive" and "hyperactive-impulsivity." Some kids with attention deficit disorder repeatedly fail to finish tasks, get distracted easily, a...

Henri is supposed to help you with this big project the boss requested. He gives you lots of his time and advice. He seems extremely helpful, particularly in correcting mistakes and oversights. You feel fortunate to have his assistance. However, a few days later the boss is giving you an inquisition about all the mistakes you made, how much time it is taking, and questioning the materials you are ...

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